(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Microcosm"

' 0. ■>■ 



./ 



'ftf •'. ~ l A 



mm 






Seniors page 16 
Faculty page 96 




l?**a 



1 BflB -i~JkZ — HUF~'-g*. 


•*-*~% .:"> ■ 




id-. Hi 


H '^^H^^^^BS ''HH 


k^v^B. ^^M . 


■ ■'...:- 


■'.''■ H 




.? 








Life page 126 
Advertising page 182 






INBOUND VIA PAPK & GOVFRNM 



UiCW 



u 



ENT CTR 



T GREEN UN£ 



an mm 



■*#■■■: 

9M COW*' 



Jl 





S 




MnmMr«M* 




y 




MBwfrwoan 




f 




•«*d»&^ ****** 




c 




m$m*t8i> 




aBsr" 


omtmrrmo. 


• 




mwcm&wm* 


ism 


1 


sue* 




mmpmm 


****** 



® EXIT 











To all my bud-das: Well we've traveled a long way to- 
gether and it's time to remember the good times we've 
shared. Hold back all your tears and sorrows, it's time for 
moving on my friends. Remember Jill-by 

BMM: How we ever became friends after sophomore 
year is beyond me but I am glad we are friends! Thanks 
for everything! Love me. 

TT: You were my 1st. Thanks for being a great friend. 
Love your (ex) roomie. 

Lizard: Hey baby! Don't forget the Cape and the great 
eviction episode! Good luck in everything cuz you 
deserve it all. Love ya, Sue 

Dear Michy D: Just because your a 5th yr doesn't mean I 
forgot about you. Thanks for all you have done and been 
to me. I am really going to miss you! Remember the 
promise, and try and keep the 'sucker' off your forehead! 
Good Luck at Children's. Love always Ris 




11 




t 







13 



NMB"*"*** r ' 



ilitium ll< 



III 
I * 



14 




WKtfKmt^SKBKBBKSmSmBSKSmKBHmMmSSmmmm 











SENIORS 





Elizabeth A. Aaron 

South Orleans, MA 
Communications / English 



Lisa-Marie Adams 

New Canaan, CT 
Physical Therapy 



Mary E. Adams 

Nashua, NH 

Elementary 

Education /Special Education 



Alyssa Ann Albertelli 

Arlington, MA 
Economics / Finance 





Barbara P. Allen 
Barrington, RI 
Communications/Finance 





Suzie Altemus 

Cumberland, ME 
Management 




Beth B. Anderson 
Ancaster, Ontario 
Economics / History 




Martha K. Anderson 

Haverhill, MA 
Communications 





Maria E. Andreottola 

Chestnut Hill, MA 
International Business 



Betinna P. Archilla 

Guaynabo, PR 
Biology 



Ann Marie Arena 

Haddam, CT 
Nursing 



Alexandra Columbia 
Aristizbal 

Columbia 
Management 



19 




Maria E. Arosemena 

Panama City 
International Business 




Lisa Ann Aubin 

West Roxbury, MA 
Retail Management 




.sal — to — n» N 



q^ ^ ** frfr Nn — >«*-g*-i=%. Iflla W I 





Susan L. Bain 

Lowell, MA 
Elementary Education 




Ann-Marie Bartek 

Somerset, MA 
Biology 




Christine A. Bauman 

Randolph, MA 
Nursing 




Rebecca H. Beach 

Bangor, ME 
Nursing 



20 




Diane Marie Belmonte Allison Benedict 

Chelsea, MA Boston, MA 

Communications Retail Management 



Cynthia A. Bennett 

Beverly, MA 
Nursing 




Mellisa J. Berry 

Rutland, VT 
Elementary Education 




21 




Kathryn D. Bivona 
Narrangansett, RI 
Nursing 




Elizabeth C. Black 

South Portland, ME 
Economics / Finance 





Jill Kathryn Blanchard 

Bangor, ME 

Retail Management 



Ellen Reiss Block 

Wilmington, NC 
Philosophy / French 



Leigh Anne Bolster 
North Providence, RI 
Finance 



Tracey A. Bolton 

Portsmouth, RI 
Management / Finance 



22 







Maranne Bono 

Burlington, MA 
Management 




Maria Irene Borges 

Somerville, MA 

Communications/ 

Advertising 




Michele M. Boucher 

Attleboro, MA 
Chemistry 



Monique L. Boucher 

Windsor Locks, CT 
Biology 



Kelly N. Boyle 

Sharon, MA 
Graphics 



Sharyn S. Boynton 
Toms River, NJ 
Economics / Finance 



23 





Jill E. Brace 
Brookfield, CT 
Nursing 





Andrea Carol Bradley 

Westborough, ME 
Communications 




Margaret Brown 

Walpole, MA 
Elementary Education 



Teresa E. Brown 
Broad Brook, CT 
Math 



Alyssa L. Burger 
Fairfield, CT 
International Business 



Audrey A. Burke 

Longmeadow, MA 
Retail Management 



24 






Laura Lee Cachianes 

Boston, MA 
Finance 



Toni Carmosino 
Braintree, MA 
Nutrition 



Sharon Carpenter 
West Hartford, CT 
Management 



Katherine M. Caldwell 

Crosswicks, NJ 
English 



Natalie Callendar 

Philadelphia, PA 
Sociology 



Elizabeth M. Campbell 

South Yarmouth, MA 
Communications 






25 



A 




Donna Carter 

Arlington, MA 
Nursing 



Marie Ellen Carter 

Wasilla, AK 
Physical Therapy 



Merrian Carver 

Darien, CT 
Management 



Lynne Chase Cary 

Radnor, PA 
Economics / Finance 




Lisa M. Casey 

Lajolla, CA 
Management 




Christen S. 
Chamberlain 

Cohasset, MA 
Finance / Economics 






Pauline Cho 
Chestnut Hill, MA 
Management 



fZt ,/»gf f ^i <=i_^a— yt- — UL^J3L *& fr 






Blanca L. Chow 

Boston, MA 
International Business 




Jennifer Ann 
Christensen 
Lincoln, RI 
Communications 



Margaret F. Clarkson 

Woodbury, CT 
Retail Management 



Lisa Karen Cloutier 

W. Peterborough, NH 
Advertising / English 



Heather C. Cody 

North Attleboro, MA 
Biology 



27 



PROFILE: MARTHA ANDERSON 



By Samantha Meltzer 

Martha Anderson is an energetic senior who believes 
that "everyone has something to contribute" and has tak- 
en her own advice. She worked her way up from news 
writer to Features Editor, To Editor-in-Chief of The 
Simmons News. During her four years at Simmons, she 
served on dorm council for two, co-chaired the Mr. 
Simmons Contest, and completed a non-credited 
internship with the Boston Red Sox. 

"I never planned on being a communications major or 
a newspaper editor," states Anderson who originally 
wanted to be a physical therapy major. Due to her per- 
sonal enjoyment of writing and her interest in Alden 
Poole's journalism class, she decided to switch majors. 
Anderson is quick to point out the support system at 



Simmons which made the demanding job of editor worth 
the effort. "I would not have realized the strength of the 
support system here unless I took challenges." 

Although Anderson believes it's important to recog- 
nize the criticism of others, "what I think about work is 
most important to me. I set high standards for myself 
and tend to be an extremist." 

She is excited to graduate and says she would not have 
made it without the support and encouragement of her 
family and friends. "I've had to become tough-skinned 
and confident enough to take a stand. My family has 
been great about helping me keep things in perspective. 
The newspaper takes a lot of time and seems all-encom- 
passing. My friends and I manage to take advantage of 
free time to really enjoy ourselves. 




29 



*■& 




Debra Ellen Cohen 

Randolph, MA 
Physical Therapy 



Laura M. Colletti 

Southboro, MA 

Math /Computer Science 



Mara J. Collins 

Brewster, NY 
International Relations 




tr- rc* — Bsi — Sa at 



qi ^ Kfc ^ It >q r+-+\ MEt fo% TK1 IO- 




June Elam Coolidge 

Milton, MA 
Open 




Sarah Ann Cooper 

Hoboken, NJ 
International Relations 




Susan P. Coswell 
Ashburnham, MA 
Government/Spanish/ 
Political Science 



30 




Christine M. Cotter 

Cohasset, MA 
Management 




Mary Claire Curran 

Milton, MA 
Physical Therapy 





Elizabeth A. Curry 

Braintree, MA 
Physical Therapy 



Maura Kelly Curtin 
Houston, TX 
Psychology 



Nancy B. Curtis 
Foxboro, MA 
Management /Finance 



Michele J. Cyr 

Bridgewater, MA 
Psychology 



31 



„3 




Suzy Davidson 
Princeton, NJ 
Retail Management 




Elizabeth A. Denmark 

Cataumet, MA 
Physical Therapy 




J5I — te» ^ N 





Denise P. 

Jay, ME 
Nursing 



Deschene 



Diane M. Di Maina 

Jamaica Plain, MA 
English / Education 



Lisa D. Diamantis 

Manchester, NH 
Retail Management 




Robyn Lee Diehl 

Riverside, CT 
Management/ Finance 



32 




Kamala Lisa Dillas 

Bermuda 

Management 



Kathy L. Dinopoulos 

Belmont, MA 
Physical Therapy 



Katherine M. Dortch 

Long Valley, NJ 
Accounting 




Rebecca Lee Dosick 

Longmeadow, MA 
English 





Lisa Jean Dowley 

Franklin, MA 
Physical Therapy 







Darcey E. Downing 

Winchester, MA 
Philosophy 



33 




Lisa Joan Dubino 

Greenfiled, MA 
Management 





Kathleen M. Dunigan 

Plymouth, MA 
Biology 




Margaret Dziadek 

Silver Spring, MD 
Nutrition 



Heidi E. Edmunds 

West Yarmouth, MA 
Open 



Deborah R. Edwin 

Northport, NY 
Physical Therapy 



Pamela Elias 

Tequesta, FL 
Biology 



34 




Karen E. Elwood 

Lakeville, CT 

English / Communications 




Staci Elkins 

Worcester, MA 
Management 




Alison Beth Ellsworth 

Ashland, MA 
Finance / Economics 




Susan Beth Emple 

Bangor, ME 
Advertising 



Lisa Marie Erbetta 

Marblehead, MA 
Management/ Art 



Jennifer R. Everett 

Pittsburg, PA 
Retail Management 



35 





Elizabeth A. Eyler 

Boston, MA 
Communications 




Margaret Ann Fallon 

Boston, MA 
Management 




Risa Jill Farber 

Spring Valley, NY 
Human Services 



Michele M. Farr 

Woodbury, CT 
Management 



Mary E. Fee 
Mountain Lakes, NJ 
Retail Management 



Maria A. Fernando 

West Orange, NJ 
International Relations 



36 




Anna Ferullo 

Everett, MA 
Nursing 




Laura Fionda 
Stoneham, MA 
Finance 



Linda J. Foley 

Wollaston, MA 

Biology /Computer Science 



Barbara J. Freeman 

New York, NY 
Retail Management 




Elizabeth A. Furey 

West Bridgewater, MA 
Finance 




Lisa Ann Galatis 
Medford, MA 
Finance / Economics 




37 




38 



STUDENT PROFILE: ANN TRAMONTOZZI 



By Diane McFarland 

"Basically, I'm a pretty laid-back, outgoing person," 
says Ann Tramontozzi, a Simmons senior who double 
majors in Human Services and Sociology. "I try not to 
dwell on things, and if something is wrong, I never let it 
ruin my day." 

The resilience and easygoing attitude of Ann can also 
be seen in the diversity of the activities she has been in- 
volved in while at Simmons. As a junior she was Presi- 
dent of Smith Hall, and this year Ann has become even 
more involved with residence life as an R.A. in Simmons 
Hall, and as a member of the R.A. selection task force. 
Ann enjoys her floor, and especially likes the fact that 



freshmen through seniors take part in floor activities. 
"Being an R.A. has given me a chance to see a different 
view of residence life by working so closely with the 
residence staff. It has also helped me to establish closer 
bonds with floor members." 

Ann is also president of Sociology Liaison, and senior 
chairwoman of Father /Daughter Weekend, making her 
last year at Simmons both busy and exciting. 

"I've really enjoyed my four years here, and I like 
Simmons because it is such a personalized, close-knit 
community. After graduation, I am confident that I will 
be fully prepared to start my future career." 





Carrie Gard 

Rye, NH 
Human Services 



Roberta D. Garvani 

Medford, MA 
Management 



Melissa A. Gerold 

Boston, MA 
English 



Laurie Ann Gibson 

Foxborough, MA 
Management 




Jacqueline Giron 
Washington, DC 
Communications 




Donna E. Gliklich 

Edison, NJ 
Open 




40 




<3B — fz« **% t* t*_ m ** _m £2 da & — na. 






Gretchen M. Goeldner 

South Hadley, MA 
Retail Management 







Allison Goldberg 

East Brunswick, NJ 
International Relations 




Lisa Gouveia 

Taunton, MA 
Management 



Susan B. Green 
Berkley Heights, NJ 
Management 



Nancy Ann Guillette 
West Hartford, CT 
International 
Relations /English 




Tara Lee Hageman 

Old Saybrook, CT 
Physical Therapy 



41 




Audrey Lois Hall 

Ashburnham, MA 
Nursing 



Audrey Jane Hanson 

Sturbridge, MA 
Political Science/ 
International Relations 



Liza H. Haroutunian 

Arlington, MA 
Economics / Finance 



Christina B. Harris 

Belmont, MA 
Management 




Hilary Diane Haynes 

Cohasset, MA 
International Business 



42 




Catherine H. Hazen 

Weston, MA 
Cursing 




Lisa Ann Heath 
Avon, CT 
Nursing 





Heidi Ann Heltzel 
Jamaica Plain, MA 
International Business 



Jennifer M. 

Wilton, CT 
Management 



Hessel Christine M. Hickey 

Natick, MA 
Nursing 



Linda Jean Hiltz 

Maiden, MA 
Public Relations/ 
Communications 



43 




Shoko Hirao 

Kashihara Nara 
Communications 





Elisabeth G. Hufnagel 

Centerville, MA 
Physical Therapy 



e*_fc» bd_tea» — B*- 





Susan Lynn Hurwitz 

Bristol, CT 
Nursing 



Blanca A. Irizarry 
Rio Piedras, PR 
Management 



Susan Jacobellis 
Danbury, CT 
Public Relations 



Bronwen M. James 

Concord, MA 
Economics / Finance 



44 




;,':¥■.. : mmmi%z 



[imberly A. Jansen 

/eston, MA 
ursing 




Jennie Ann Jenkins 

Guilford, CT 
Political Science 



Lisa Suzanne Johnson 

Brookline, MA 
Nursing 




Allison C. Jones 

Guilford, CT 
Biology 




Marlene Ann Kaiter 

Boxford, MA 
Retail Management 




Melanie N. Kamamis 
Great Neck, NY 
Economics/ Finance 



45 




Paula F. Keane 

Scituate, MA 

English / Communications 




* » M' 




Catherine M. Kilroy 

West Roxbury, MA 
Nursing 





Kyung Ok Kim 

Waltham, MA 
Nursing 



Cynthia M. Kirwin 

Wellesley, MA 
Nursing 



Jennifer L. Knapp 
Willimantic, CT 
Nursing /Human Services 



Paula Marie Knowlton 
Manchester, CT 
Communications / French 



46 




Susan Marie Kotoski 

Gardner, MA 
Communications 



Joanne C. Kryszpin 

Windsor Locks, MA 
Biology 



Lydia S. Kuenkler 

Elmira, NY 
Nursing 




*\ 



Cynthia Lee Kohn 
South Orange, NJ 
Math /Computer Science 




Cheryl Marie Koor 

Peabody, MA 
Finance / Management 




Debra A. LaBella 

Cumberland, RI 
Management 



47 







Student Profile 



Maritza Padilla is an active and enthusiastic Senior! 
majoring in Human Services and Sociology. She came anci 
quickly began to enjoy the small, supportive atmosphere 01 
a women's college that is characteristic of Simmons. "I like 
the fact that the professors care, and focus on the students 
as individuals and not numbers." 

During her four years as an undergraduate student, 
Maritza has been quite active in the Black Hispanic Organi- 
zation, a group that brings black and Hispanic students to- 
gether for cultural events and programs, as well as informal| 
talks. This year Maritza served as Sister of Organization, a 
vice-presidential position for the B.H.O. 

As a senior, Maritza also focuses a lot of her time andi 
energies towards her future as a Human Services profes 
sional. "Right now I am working at English High, in the| 
Parenting Program, with teenage mothers. Eventually I 
would like to counsel teens, especially in the Hispanic com- 
munity." 

Maritza has had a productive four years at Simmons, and: 
looks forward to continued success in the future. 

Diane McFarland 



V 






48 





49 





Alicia Ann 
Lagunowich 
West Redding, CT 
Finance / Management 




Amy June Lakin 
Brielle, NJ 
Physical Therapy 




Laura M. Langone 

Boston, MA 
International 
Relations /International 
Business 



Susan M. Larson 

Yarmouth, MA 
Physical Therapy 



Katharine M. Larsson 

Doylestown, PA 
Nursing 



Dianne Latham 

Whitman, MA 
Elementary Education 



50 




Uretchen Laubner 

\Iahant, MA 
Management 



Katherine Law 

Arlington, MA 
Retail Management 



Lauri Eileen Law 

East Sandwich, MA 
Management 



Mary E. Laz 

Dennisport, MA 
Communications / Political 
Science 




Lisa Lee 

Cambridge, MA 
Biology 




Nancy E. Lessard 
Boston, MA 
Physical Therapy 




■' 



mm*Wmm 



*■ 



mm;- m^i 

■ ■■•■■ ■ 





§m mo ,ancs * «• mum 






■ 






It «gi • ■ 






■m -mpm * «• «* 










-.... ^^1 


BlIIBg' #WW*y **5*r*» •* 




tk t. 


fS 4»«r mm 

2 ,■:£'■' 

' ' ■ > • ^ f:'^ ~ ■- Ifc 

■:■:■■:■' . ■. . x-'-.': ■ ■■ ■...■■■:■■■■. 

-,^m m mmm > - i 

' mmm <** mmm m mmm 
mmmm mmmm m 

1 mmm mmm m 

^K; ?,^\ ,mk mm mm&m 





51 




Randi Meryl Levine 

Maiden, MA 
Communications / English 



Beth Ellen Lewensohn 

Milwaukee, WI 
Retail Management 



Joanne Lewis 

Ithaca, NY 

Retail Management 



Gillian Ley 

West Hartford, CT 
Communications 




Vivian Eva Lichtmann 

Mc Lean, VA 
English /French 




Kristine M. Lino 

East Boston, MA 
Management 



52 





tk m — «=*- 





Nancy N.S. Liou 
Somerville, MA 
Management 




Sherri B. Lloyd 

Chester, VT 
Retail Management 




Maura E. Loftus 
Brockton, MA 
Nursing 



Jodi Lutsky 

Long Meadow, MA 
Psychology 



Melanie-Jane Lyons 

Brighton, MA 
International 
Relations / Sociology 



Christina L. MacVicar 

Nantucket, MA 
Biology 



53 




Pamela A. Mader 

Wyckoff, NJ 
Management 



Kimberly Ann Martin 
Barrington, RI 
Economics 



Claire A. Martinez 

Scarsdale, NY 

English / Communications 



Jerene Lynn Matteo 
North Providence, RI 
Nursing 





Catherine E. Mattson 
Guilford, CT 
Communications 








Deahne S. Mayrowetz 

West Caldwell, NJ 
Physical Therapy 



54 




Caren McBride 

Volfeboro, NH 
'sychology 



Eileen S. McCaffrey 

Millers Falls, MA 
Management 






Marisa McCarthy 

Roslindale, MA 

Math /Computer Science 



Susan W. McGaffigan 

Pembroke, MA 
Education 



Marsha McGuinness 

Dennis, MA 

Sociology /Human Services 



Lynne J. McLeod 

Warwick, RI 

International Relations /Spanish 



55 




Beth Melissa Miller 

Waterbury, CT 
Nutrition 



Deborah Ann Miller 

Cheshire, CT 

Human Services /Psychology 



Debra Jane Miller 

Brookline, MA 
Nursing 



Sharon Carol Millett 

Saugerties, NY 
Physical Therapy 



56 




Vnne Marie 
*lontminy 

.ewiston, ME 
Communications 




Stephanie Moran 

North Chelmsford, MA 
Finance / Management 



Kathleen Ann 
Morenski 

Lynnfield, MA 
International Relations 




Freddi Faye Moskowitz 
Toms River, NJ 
Elementary Education 




Yvonne Moukides 
Fort Lee, NJ 
Physical Therapy 




Christine Mueller 

Scarsdale, NY 
International Business 



57 




STUDENT PROFILE: 






LABGO 




Tina MacVicar is a down-to-earth young woman with 
great deal of ambition. A biology major at Simmons, he) 
goal is to pursue graduate education in ecology anc 
environmental studies. Tina is from Nantucket 
Massachusetts and stated, "I found Boston a big change; 
from coming from a small town." However, Tina hasi 
enjoyed the city and has taken advantage of its oppor- 
tunities, such as attending concerts and going tc 
museums, as well as nights "out on the town." Tina also 
did volunteer work at Children's Hospital her freshman 
through senior years. 

This year Tina is the secretary of the Biology Liaison 
and is working hard on her senior research project under 
the guidance of Professor Karen Talentino. She is 
working at the Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary studying) 
"the time and energy budgeting of a particular bird." 
She is also working with another biology major, Kath-J 
leen Dunigan. 

Tina feels that it was her Sea Semester experience that 
confirmed her interest in Biology. This program consists 
of spending a semester away from the college. She spent 
six weeks studying on shore and six weeks studying at 
sea aboard a schooner. 

Tina is looking forward to graduation and stated "Thei 
friendships I have made here are friendships I will have 
for life." Tina has enjoyed Simmons and feels that as a 




58 



TINA MAC VICAR 



women's college it "has made me aware of the sexism 
and I feel I am prepared to face the problems in the 
working world." Tina also stated that the professors are 
great and their support was always there when she need- 
! ed it. 






By Samantha Meltzer 







Jeanne Rose Murphy 

Brockton, MA 
Elementary Education 





Anne R. Napolitano 

Scarsdale, NY 
Psychology 





Laura Gale Nerenberg 

Potomac, MD 
Communications 



Elizabeth A. O'Connor 
Bloomfield, NJ 
Physical Therapy 



Jane Marie O'Loughlin Janis L. Oolie 

West Roxbury, MA North Caldwell, NJ 

English /Communications Retail Management 






Karen S. Oppenheim 

Medford, MA 
Finance 




Charlene A. Owen 

South Eastern, MA 
Psychology / Management 





Kathleen M. Pacyna 

Berwick, ME 
Management / Psychology 



Maritza Padilla 

New Haven, CT 

Human Services /Sociology 



Cheryl Ann Page 

Abington, MA 
Nursing 



Alexandra J. Pannell 

Mattapoisett, MA 
Finance 



61 








Pamela Parthum 

Lawrence, MA 
Math / Economics 




Rita Pattavina 

Quincy, MA 
Management 




Stacey S. Pazar 

Arlington, MA 
Chemistry 



Kristen M. Peterson 

Portola Valley, CA 

Early Childhood Education 



Natalie M. Pignatone 

Burlington, MA 
Nutrition 



Catherine M. Pinto 

Needham, MA 
Finance 



62 




Diane Plemenos 

^exington, MA 
Vrt Administration 



Liza Kristin Poole 
Madison, CT 
Finance 



Jacqueline Price 

Fort Lauderdale, FL 
Political Science/ 
Communications 



Anne L. Priestley 

Westport, MA 
Nursing 







Kathyann Rajcula 
Brookfield, CT 
Communications / Advertis- 
ing 





Ingrid R. Ramsey 

Scarsdale, NY 
Economics / Finance 




63 



IHMHRBIBHaaTaKW] 




Karen Ann Rebello 

North Easton, MA 
Management / Communica- 
tions 



Emily P. Reed 

Brookline, MA 
Psychology 




Victoria Ann Reiff Leigh Remington 

Philadelphia, PA Rochester, NY 

Psychology / Communications Biology 




Shari Lynne Roemer 

Princeton, NJ 
International 
Relations / Accounting 




Mary Rogers 

Greenbush, NY 
Physical Therapy 




64 





Michelle L. Roland 
Manchester, CT 
Political Science 




-*2J — fft +?& ta n m 



j* f3f fr nt 



Caroline Ruggeri 

Westwood, MA 
Management 




Anne A. Rundle 

Newton, MA 
International Relations 



Janet Ellen Russell 

Kennebunk, ME 
Math / Economics 



Jill Palmer Rutherford 

Winthrop, MA 
Physical Therapy 



Cristine Rykowski 

Boston, MA 

Early Childhood Education 






65 



ifl 






C. Heather Salem 

North Brookfield, MA 
Economics /Political Science 



Cindy Santiesteban 

Newton, MA 
Retail Management 



Lynn Ellen Santospago Nancy Beth Scali 

Westboro, MA Belmont, MA 

Graphics /Advertising Nursing 






Lois Schaeneman 

Somers, CT 
Management 



p-i w* ^ e% ffi -tei 





Susan M. Scheffer 

Clifton, NJ 
Accounting / Finance 



66 




Amy L. Schwartz 

Cherry Hill, NJ 
Nursing 




Danielle L. Schwartz 
Georgetown, MA 
Graphics 




: ' 



K^Tl-%fc Zr • - ft* to fc^mX 

Im^ooP IP*' p* ■ • #» . r 

fW^Hw?i m * » • J * <% 

« <j * • ^ A •* m tr'S 

l ft mm-' < i * * — - • * 





Nancy Sara Schwartz 

Brookline, MA 
Retail Management 



Jennifer Ann Scorpio 

North Providence, RI 
International 
Relations / Spanish 



Cheryl Ann Scott 
Stratford, CT 
Accounting / Finance 



Jacqueline Screeton 

Mission Viejo, CA 
English / Communications 



67 



-/jrmji> 







Cheryl Anne Sgroi 

Hurley, NY 
Physical Therapy 



^g 


t 


m 


^1% 




■:: : "i- 




Deborah M. Shaer 
Monroe, OH 
Communications 



-fil — to Hi {& 



ci ^ a M tn — i^-g»-^- nt fr* *** 





Alyson Gail Shaffer 

Marblehead, MA 
Elementary / Special 
Education 




Judith L. Shaw 

Waltham, MA 
Retail Management 



Sachiko Shimomura 

Kobe 

Sociology 



Kimberly Siegel 

Randolph, MA 
Management 



68 





Kristin Jo Simplicio 

Wilton, CT 

Finance / Communicatons 



Staci Anne Slavin 
Brentwood, CA 
Communications / French 



Allysen D. Sloane 

Framingham, MA 
Physical Therapy 




Andrea E. Smith 

Amherst, MA 
Physical Therapy 





Hilary Smith 

Newton, MA 
Nursing 




Sheryl E. Soucy 
, Rutland, MA 
Nursing / Sociology 



69 




Anne E. Spillane 

Wayne, PA 

Early Childhood Education/ 

Psychology 





Dawn Marie Stanislaw 

Birmingham, MI 
Accounting / Math 





Nina I. Steere- Alberto 

Walpole, MA 
Math /Finance 



Ruth Dora Strachman 

Framingham, MA 
OPEN 



Christine M. Stranberg Joyce Strong 

West Roxbury, MA Somerville, MA 

Management .Nursing 



70 










Lisa M. Sweeney 

Taunton, MA 
Physical Therapy 




Siobhan Sweeney 

Bristol, RI 

Biology 




Lisa Anne Sweenor 

Wakefield, RI 

Computer Science /Finance 



Audrey E. Swensen 

Bethesda, MD 

Special Education /Math 



Marissa Taranto 

West Newton, MA 
Management / Finance 



Mary E. Taylor 

Chelmsford, MA 
Psychology 



71 



BUI 





Susan Beth Taylor 

Somers, CT 
Psychology 





Jacqueline Teta 

Maiden, MA 
Elementary Education 




Mary Thomas 
Melrose, MA 
Math /History 



Josefina Toirac 

Longmeadow, MA 
Management 



Ingrid Tomich 

Charlestown, MA 
International 
Business / Spanish 



Lauren Ann Tondora 

Milford, CT 
Physical Therapy 



72 




fudy Toy 
Brighton, MA 
Accounting / Finance 




Traci Rene Turner 

West Haven, CT 
Psychology 



Ann Marie 
Tramontozzi 

Norwich, CT 

Sociology /Human Services 



Alexa Tsokanis 

Brockton, MA 
Finance / Economics 



Hariet G. Tuchman 

New Orleans, LA 
Communications 





Sarah Louise Tyler 
Cheshire, MA 
Nursing 



73 




Sharon Lynn Vivens 

Roxbury, MA 
Political Science 



Susan E. Vogler 

Centerville, MA 
Nutrition 




Jessica Wall 

Brookline, MA 
Retail Management 



Wendy Susan Weaver 

Thomaston, ME 
Art Administration 




Tracy Diane Webster 
Philadelphia, PA 
Advertising / Communica- 
tions 




Catherine Wong 

Boston, MA 
Accounting / Finance 




74 



-gj — 1£$ vr & — P» — i-* ui > M 1*4 Vd+ tfi — ifc* «~» 




Lauren M. Wyke 
Lexington, MA 
Retail Management 



Elaine Y. Yee 

Brookline, MA 
Management 




Jennifer Kelly 

Manchester, NH 
Economics 



Jean Thistle 

Reading, MA 
Math 






75 



SENIORS NOT PICTURED 



Jennifer Abbott 
Litchfield, CT 
Physical Therapy 

Maria T. Agullo 
San Juan, PR 
Communications / Psychology 



Margaret Bushman 

Newark, DE 

American Studies /Womens Studies 

Felicia Captain 
Lynnfield MA 
Political Science /International Relations 



Diana Georgeou 
Manchester, NH 
Psychology 

Pamela Gill 

Brookline, MA 

Graphics / Communications 



Nancy D. Baffo 

Revere, MA 

International Business /Spanish 



Jean S. Carter 
New Canaan, CT 
Retail Management 



Vicki-Beth Golburgh 
Brookline, MA 
Nutrition 



Caroline Benavides 
Glastonbury, CT 
Physical Therapy 

Therese Bissonnette 
Woonsocket, RI 
Physical Therapy 

Martha Heath Bloodgood 
West Hartford, CT 
Retail Management 

Karen Blumenthal 
Roslyn, NY 
International Business 



Sonia S. Carter 
Dorchester, MA 
Nutrition 

Susan Helene Cheski 
Honolulu, HI 
Communications 

Mary E. Clark 
Bristol, NH 
Physical Therapy 

Elizabeth L. Cohen 
Westerville, OH 
Communications / History 



Jill Alyson Goldblatt 
Longmeadow, MA 
Advertising 

Nicole Goodman 
Ocean City, MD 
Management 

Jill Hadfield 
Fairfield, CT 
Biology 

Karin Halliwell 
Yonkers, NY 
Art 



Nancy Ann Boisen 
Cupertino, CA 
Management 

Christine A. Booras 
Lynnfield, MA 
Retail Management 

Jennifer J. Bousquet 
Chelmsford, MA 
International Business 

Anne C. Boyd 
Prospect, KY 
Open 

Nayda Bragan 
Ponce, PR 
Management 

Jill Brodsky 

New York, NY 

Political Science /Communications 

Claudia Key Brown 

Wilton, CT 

Retail Management 

Ma. Regina Buenaventura 
Brighton, MA 
Management 



Sari Beth Cohen 
Hollidaysburg, PA 
Communications 

Janet D'Alelio 
Melrose, MA 
English 

Jane Danforth 
Weston, MA 
Physical Therapy 

Julianne De Marco 
Winchester, MA 
Elementary Education 

Patricia M. Di Giovanni 
Belmont, MA 
Communications 

Caroline Exelby 
Grandview, NY 
Graphics 

Jennifer Fox 
Nahant, MA 

Miriam Fox 
Boston, MA 
Communications /Art 



Donna Hanford 
Cornwall, PA 
Management 

Maureen Ann Harmon 
Winnetka, IL 

Elizabeth Harvey 
Hingham, MA 
Psychology 

Victoria Hawkins 
Boston, MA 
Retail Management 

Jerrrine Henriksen-Payne 
Cape Elizabeth, ME 
Art 

Pamela Carol Hubley 
Winthrop, MA 
Management 

Christine Hughes 

Holliston, MA 

Management /Political Science 

Gretchen Hurley 
East Greenwich, RI 
International Relations 



76 



SENIORS NOT PICTURED 



Caryl Anne Ix 
Kinnelon, NJ 
Retail Management 

j Anne Oi-Lan Jim 

; Boston, MA 

i Finance /Management 

Jennifer Kelly 
Manchester, NH 

Economics 

i 

Elizabeth Kiester 
Westport, CT 

Roxanne Larochelle 
Sommerville, MA 
English 

Yvette Lavigne 
Cambridge, MA 
Finance 

Debra Laviolette 
Boston, MA 
Physical Therapy 

Rachel Levine 
Exeter, NH 
Human Services 

Elyse Lindberg 
Houston, TX 
Management 

Cheryl Ann Mac Rae 
Holliston, MA 
Retail Management 

Karen Maffucci 
Wellesley, MA 
Art Administration 

Carolyn Magnuson 

Northboro, MA 

Public Relations /Economics 

Kalie Lynn Malcolmson 
Miami, FL 
Philosphy/Womens Studies 

Pamela Manganaro 
Marshfield, MA 
Communications 

Rene Mann 
Santa Anna, CA 
Art 



Kimberely Mc Evoy 
Yarmouth, MA 
Biology 

Jenifer Mc Guinn 
Washington, DC 
Graphics 

Barbara Ann Mc Gurl 
Belmont, MA 
Nutrition 

Michele Meissner 
Boston, MA 
Management 

Jennifer Menezes 
Barrington, RI 
Retail Management 

Jennifer Merrill 
Franklin Lakes, NJ 
Communications 

Stephanie Merrill 
Allston, MA 
French 

Whitney Miskell 
Bolton, MA 
Nursing 

Valerie Moore 
Hillsborough, CA 
English / Communications 

Robin Moyer 
Bath, ME 
Economics 

Theresa O'Sullivan 
Hingham, MA 
Communications / English 

Linda Oshman 
Hilldale, NJ 
Communications / English 

Victoria Oster 
Mequon, WI 
English 

Lauren Beth Parnes 
Miami, FL 
International Relations 

Sarah Patton 
Shutesbury, MA 
Sociology 



Jennifer Philbrick 
Milford, NH 
Management 

Susan Podbielski 
Shrewsbury, MA 
Nursing 

Heather Ann Premru 
Stow, MA 
English / Economics 

Joan Quinn 
Southbridge, MA 
Public Relations 

Aurora Ramirez 
Ponce, PR 
Graphics /Art 

Diane Ransom 
Newton Centre, MA 

Mary Reddan 
West Hartford, CT 
Nutrition 

Eugenia Renzi 
Westwood, MA 
Retail Management 

Theresa Rice 
Sioux City, SD 
Retail Management 



77 



SENIORS NOT PICTURED 



Jill Rosenthal 
Attleboro, MA 
Nursing 

Kathleen Shaw 
Warwick, RI 
Communications 

Patricia Ann Slotter 
Brighton, MA 
History /Economics 

Kelly Starvish 
Fairhaven, MA 
Nursing 

Patrisha Sweeney 

Boston, MA 

Retail Management 

Julie Ventola 
Melrose, MA 
Management 



Linda Sahagian 
Hanover, MA 
Management 


Tracy Savage 
Brighton, MA 
Management 


Sandra Shirley 
Somerville, MA 
Physical Therapy 


Carolyn Shute 
South Easton, MA 
English 


Katherine Smith 
Woodhaven, NY 
English 


Andrea Snow 
Roxbury, MA 
Communications 


Maria Paz Staulo 
Newton Center, MA 
International Business /Spanish 


Barbara Stein 
Newton, MA 
Psychology 


Jean Thistle 
Reading, MA 
Math 


Barbara Timmons 
Dedham, MA 
Womens Studies 


Cynthia Well 

Boston, MA 

International Relations /History 


Holland Williams 
New York, NY 
Graphics 





78 








79 




IR: Remember DI. DP's. Where's JF?. Rabbit. GC. Tylenol 
12/85 All Nighter's— NEVER AGAIN! CP 

JF: Where Are You?? CP, IR 

CP: Todos Los Dias . . . NEVER AGAIN! IR 

Thanks MA, MF, RR, KH, For all the good times . . . Red 
Sox, Celtics, Beer, Ruby's Late nights, Coppers, and the 
Cask.. LC 

Tina — Lets do "bowling" sometime! Luv Debs 

Lyds — Elmira isn't too far away! — Luv Debs 

Wendi — It's been great kiddo! — Luv Debs 

Ding — Who needs words? Keep the twinkle Kiddo! — Luv 
Debs 

TM. CH, WW, DE, MCC, and AS. Thanks for a great time 
in Florida and the best three years ever! I'll miss you all, 
SO visit LA. soon! Love LK 




80 






81 







82 







^ 






S 



«** 



-s H 



*. J' 







3 



■*-*■ -^— Jfc^ 



■ Simmons College 
All Hospitals 
Medical Schools 






MetroParkways 






so^i 




83 












84 












85 







86 







87 



II 




if 




88 





I 




.■i 




89 














90 





W- 





91 



Oppie: "You is the bestest friend I ever Have." Love al- 
ways, Bill 

LK, CS, KD, SM: I'll never forget. RD 

Betsy: I think you need another Internship. 
Happy Valentines' Day. 

To Kath M.: A Top Hat in every way. 

You made my four years. Stay like you are for the rest of 

yours. Rebecca 

To Audra and Trishka: My bestest roomies. I'll never for- 
get you guys! Love always Lisa 



To Yanssa: Sempre recordero La Prinavera en Italia! 



To Kris and Laura: We'll get to Austria yet! Love, Lisa 
Anne and Lynne: Always Remember "Quest for Vision" 
I'll miss you! Love, Sue 

All my love forever: to my parents, Dorothy and Paul, 
family and Thomas. Love, Cheryl 





92 




ALH, LJD, JRM, Remember the wild parties, Thurs. 
nights and graduation times to come on the cape! I'll 
miss you guys and will always think of a fantastic senior 
year. Love LSK 

"Often it takes as much courage to resist, as it does to go 
ahead" CP 

Kim: How does it feel? Love Cheryl 

Sue H. You've made my four years here really great. 
Thanks AA 

To the Original Dix Hall Freshwomen: Thanks for the 
memories. Dudie 

KL: Hey Baaay-beee! Thanks for four years of fun, 
friendship, and laughter. HC 

To FARBER FACE: It's been an uphill battle but worth it. 
T.F.B.A.F. TT 

Medieval Manor: Thanks flea for a night I'll never for- 
get. NC 





93 







94 










95 




FACULTY 



— IIIWIMI'U lll llllll Mi ll II ■ w I H UH I mill Ml 






SIMMONS COLLEGE 

300 THE FENWAY 
BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 021 15-5898 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



Dear Class of 1987: 

"So what are you going to do when you grow up?" How many 
times have you heard that? I was looking at a list of PSAT scores 
recently and thought again how long that list extends. Kindergarten, 
or nursery school or day care to get ready for elementary school, 
then on to middle school and high school or day school or boarding 
school to get ready for the right college. And PSAT's and NMSQT's 
and SAT's to help in the process; and now except for the hardy 
few who have taken GRE's or GMAT's or one of the other G's and 
are going to graduate school, the process is over. One third, more 
or less, of your life invested in education and now you really have 
to face the question. 

At Simmons we pride ourselves in our education which helps you 
answer the question; but we can only help, you have to develop 
the answer. Independent study, internships, fieldwork all help 
define an area or a profession, but there is a larger question 
imbedded. It is, of course, "who are you going to be?" Graduations, 
like all transitions, are times of anxiety. During such times we all 
tend to crouch down and settle for security for what we can do 
rather than what we can be. Understandable as this reaction is, 
you don't want to give into it all the way. In the long run it is 
the much more important question, and this is a particularly good 
point to begin to resolve it. In a real sense an important part of 
what you have paid for during these educational years, in time and 
in tuition, is the vantage point you now have to face this issue. 
Pru frock measured his life away in coffee spoons, this transition 
gives you the opportunity to see a large part of your life as a whole 
and to project the patterns that your life is taking into the future. 

This is an exciting time in your life and if you face it a productive 
time. We all wish you the very best and stand ready to help if we can. 

Yours, 



lt/Mc*J> 



William J. Holmes 





ADMINISTRATION 




William J. Holmes 
President 

Priscilla L. McKee 
Administrative Vice President 



99 




COLLEGE 
DEANS 



Charlotte Morocco 
Dean 

Elizabeth Rawlins 
Associate Dean 

Carolyn Holland 
Associate Dean 




100 



SIMMONS COLLEGE 

300 THE FENWAY 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 021 15-5898 



OFFICE OF THE DEAN 



Dear Members of the Class of 1987, 

In preparing to write this letter, I pulled the 1983 Orientation/ 
Student Handbook "All Aboard" off my shelf and reflected on the 
programs and activities we had planned for your first experiences 
at Simmons College. The overwhelming feeling I had as I turned 
the pages was that your Orientation seemed to me like it happened 
just yesterday. I couldn't help but wonder if all the dreams and 
hopes for your success that you and we had on that August morning 
have been realized. 

Then I reminded myself that it's too soon to answer that 
question. While it is possible to make some judgments about what 
you have learned and how much you have grown, it will take years 
before either you or we can assess the success of our journey 
together. However, if you look at the lives of the thousands of 
graduates who have gone before you, there is every reason for 
optimism. For the one consistent quality in the lives of our 
alumnae is that Simmons did indeed inspire "the self-confidence 
and spirit of independence that permits them to have rich personal 
lives and gives them the competence to be useful members of 
society". 

I prefer to think of your Commencement as just another step along 
the way. As you change trains you are leaving behind a legacy of 
hard work, new ideas and good friends. We will be here for you to 
return again, to receive your thoughts about the value of your 
education, to celebrate your successes, to challenge you to 
continue your journey, and to reunite you with friends and ideas. 

May your lives be filled with serendipitious experiences, and may 
you have the insight to recognize them, and the courage to enjoy 
them. 

My best wishes to each of you, 




Charlotte Morocco 
Dean of the College 



101 




;*;,;,'. ■; Si': Jjh' 






ACADEMIC DEANS 



John Robinson (top left) 

Dean of Social Sciences and Graduate Studies 



Anne Coghlan (top right) 
Dean of Sciences 



Charles Mackey (bottom) 
Dean of Humanities 



102 



AMERICAN STUDIES 




AFRO-AMERICAN 
CULTURAL AFFAIRS 




Floyd Barbour, Director of Afro American Cultural 
Affairs 



Laurie Crumpacker, Associate Professor of History; 
Richard Sterne, Ph.D., Professor of English 




HISTORY 
DEPARTMENT 



Mark Solomon, Professor of History; 
Debra Bloom, Secretary; Henry 
Halko, Professor of History; Laurie 
Crumpacker, Associate Professor of 
History; Richard Lyman, Professor 
of History; John Hunter, Professor 
of History 



Li 



103 



'-7* 



DEPARTMENT OF ART AND MUSIC 




(standing) Robert Oppenheim, Professor of 
Art and Chairman of the Department of Art 
and music; Thomas Joseph Wallace, Professor 
of Art; (sitting) Robert E. Gronquist, Profes- 
sor of Music and Director of Musical Activit- 
ies, Patricia Burnham, Assistant Professor of 
Art History, (missing) Dana C. Chandler, As- 
sociate Professor of Art, (on sabbatical) Alicia 
Faxon, Associate Professor of Art History 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 



(standing) N. Sandra Williams, Professor of 
Biology and Chairman of the Department of 
Biology; Joel B. Piperberg, Assistant Professor 
of Biology; Karen A. Talentino, Associate 
Professor of Biology; Richard P. Nickerson, 
Professor of Biology (seated) Alana Dudley, 
Secretary for the Department of Biology; 
Melissa Tassinari, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
logy; Rachel C. Skvirsky, Assistant Professor 
of Biology (on sabbatical) Louis N. Irwin, 
Professor of Biology 




104 



HNS 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 



(left to right) Jerry Bell, Professor of Chemis- 
try; Leonard J. Soltzberg, Hazel Dick Leonard 
Chair Professor of Chemistry; Emel Yakali, 
Associate Professor of Chemistry; Peter Bow- 
ers, Professor of Chemistry; Iclal S. Hartman, 
Professor of Chemistry and Chairman; Katie 
Stygall 




DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE 




(standing) Leonard Jay Soltzberg, Professor 
of Computer Science, Margaret Menzin, As- 
sistant Professor of Computer Science, Ed- 
ward Prenowitz, Coordinator of the Comput- 
er Science Program Velda Goldberg, 
Associate Professor in Computer Science 
(seated) Donna Beers, Assistant Professor in 
Computer Science, Michael Brown, Assistant 
Professor in Computer Science, Constantine 
Dokos, Assistant Professor in Computer 
Science 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS 



James Cochoran, Associate professor; 
Deborah Smiley, Chairman and Associate 
Professor of Graphic Arts; Robert White, As- 
sociate Professor of Communications. 
Missing; Charles Ball, Lecturer on 
Journalism; Lynda A. Beltz, Ph.D. Professor 
of Communications; Reginald Jackson, Ph.D., 
Professor of Photo-Communications 




DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 




(standing) Susan Bloom, Director for the 
Center of Study in Children's Literature and 
Associate Professor of Education; Kathleen 
Dunn, Professor of Education and Chairman 
of the Department of Education and Human 
Services; Alice Van Deusen, Clinical Associ- 
ate Professor of Education and Coordinator of 
Special Education; Janie Ward, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Education and Coordinator of the 
Human Services Program (seated) Bard Rog- 
ers Hamlen, Clinical Associate Professor of 
Education; Helen Guttentag, Adjunct Assis- 
tant Professor of Education (on sabbatical 
Lydia Averell Hurd Smith, Professor of Edu- 
cation 



106 



VIRGINIA BRATTON REMEMBERED 




Virginia Bratton was remembered for her impeccably 
high standards, graciousness, and advising students to 
seek interesting, full lives at a memorial service in her 
honor on Sunday, September 21 in the Fens. 

President Holmes began the tribute with Miss 
Bratton's accomplishments both as a Simmons graduate 
and professional in the world of Graphic Design. During 
her 36 years of teaching Graphic Arts and Production, 
she "constantly directed her talent and energies toward 
designing catalogs, brochures, pamphlets for almost ev- 
ery department and office at Simmons. She greeted every 
new project as a new challenge," Holmes said. 

Her integrity and hard work also impressed him. "She 
was an artisan, a maker of useful and beautiful things." 

Peggy Loeb, Director of Public Information, said she 
was very proud to be a colleague and friend of Miss 
Bratton, but directed her tribute as a former student. 
Loeb pointed out Miss Bratton's "impeccably high stan- 
dards." Loeb quoted Ralph Waldo Emerson, "Each of us 
needs someone who makes us do what we can." Loeb 
said Virginia Bratton was that person. 



Two former students were quoted in Loeb's tribute. "I 
didn't dare to do anything but my best for fear of disap- 
pointing her (Miss Bratton)," one former student said. 
Another was quoted as saying, "She always treated me as 
a professional before I thought of myself as one." 

Deborah Smiley, Associate Professor of Communica- 
tions, remembered her colleague as "gracious" with a 
"high standard of excellence" Smiley said "Her work, 
like herself, was rational with a touch of whimsey." 

Anecdotes Smiley mentioned portrayed Miss Bratton 
as "persistent, caring and cooperative. Virginia really 
loved words and images. She believed that the ability to 
communicate is hollow without a message worth 
communicating." 

John Hunter, Professor of History, spoke as a "long- 
time associate." Hunter said he remembers her "penetrat- 
ing eyes which pursued a line of inquiry. Her curiosity 
was limitless; and she asked because she cared." 

Hunter said, "Her manner was warm and sensitive and 
she stated her views modestly but clearly." 



107 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 




Top: Bradley W. Bateman, Ph.D., Assistant 
Professor of Economics; Jane Sjogren, Ph.D. 
Visiting Assistant Professor; Bottom: Harriet 
G. Tolpin, Ph.D., Associate Professor and 
Chairman; Barbara A. Sawtelle, Ph.D., Associ 
ate Professor of Economics; E. Thomas Kuh, 
M.A., Instructor in Economics 



PROFILE: BRAD BATEMAN 



To some, Professor Brad Bateman is best characterized 
by the daily appearance of his bowtie, but those who; 
know him well know him as a highly intelligent and 
caring person. Professor Bateman is very enthusiastic 
about teaching and stated, "I wanted to teach at a small 
liberal arts college, mainly because I received my educa- 
tion at one and I believe in the advantages a student re- 
ceives from attending one." Bateman also firmly believes 
that to be an effective teacher one needs to have a strong 
sense of self. 

These qualities are very apparent in Bateman. In just 
his second year at Simmons, he has already become ex- 
tremely involved within the college. He served as a ju- 
nior advisor in 1985-86, a freshman advisor this year, 
taught in the freshman writing program, and has re- 
ceived an invitation to teach in the Honors program 
which will begin in the fall of 1987. 

Professor Bateman's primary interest is in the history 
of economic thought and he has set up a seminar series 
at the Harvard Kress Library, which contains economic 
documents from before the 1850's. 

When asked about his feelings regarding Simmons be- 
ing a women's college, Bateman stated, "I believe in edu- 
cation for women, but I also like the school's dedication 
to the liberal arts. When I enter a classroom I go in to 
teach; it does not matter to me whether there are men or 
women in the classroom" 




108 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 



(back row left to right) John Douglas Perry, 
Associate Professor of English; Lowry Cheng- 
Wu Pei, Assistant Professor of English and 
Director of Writing; Judith Bryant 
Wittenberg, Associate Professor of English; 
David George Gullette, Professor of English; 
Richard Clark Sterne, Professor of English 
and Director of American Studies Program; 
William Michael Manly, Associate Professor 
of English and Director of the Master of Arts 
in Liberal Studies Program; (front left to 
right) Leslie Lawrence, Assistant Professor of 
English, Pamela Starr Bromberg, Associate 
Professor of English and Chairman of the De- 
partment of English (missing) Lawrence Lee 
Langer, Professor of English and Alumnae 
Professor, Floyd Barrington Barbour, Associ- 
ate Professor of English (on sabbatical) 
Charles Edmund L'Homme, Professor of Eng- 
lish and Coordinator of the Graduate Pro- 
grams in English (on special leave) David 
Scott Perry, Professor of English 




DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 




Top: Maria Paz Staulo, M.A.; Susan M. Keane, 
Ph.D.; Deborah Fraioli, Ph.D.; Raquel Halty 
Pfaff, Ph.D.; Helen Mamikoian, M.A.; N. 
Claire Ford, secretary; Below: Mary Jane 
Treacy, Ph.D. Chairman; Mary Ellen Kiddle, 
Ph.D.; Louis Iandoli, Ph.D.; Celeste 
Kostopulos-Cooperman, Ph.D.; Louise G. Co- 
hen. Ph.D. 



109 



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Kirk Beattie, Associate Professor; Deborah Miner, 
Chairperson and Associate Professor; Nancy Gil- 
son, visiting lecturer. Missing: Carroll Miles, Pro- 
fessor of Emeritus 







INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS STEERING 

COMMITTEE 




(Back row) John Hunter, Professor of History; 
Trena Cleland, Staff Assistant; Kirk Beattie, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Political Science; (front row) 
Raquel Halty Pfaff, Associate Professor of 
Spanish; Deborah Miner, Associate Professor of 
Political Science 



110 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 




David Browder, Associate Professor; Michael 
Brown, Donna Beers, Alice Schafer, Ph.D. Lectur- 
er in Mathematics: Mallini Pillai, M.S.; Margaret 
Menzin, PH.D. Professor of Mathematics; Richard 
Cormier, M.A.T.; Norma Fleming, secretary. 



DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT 






(standing) Barbara Huff, Assistant Professor of 
Management: Bonita Betters-Reed, Assistant Pro- 
fessor in Management; Lucia F. Miree, Assistant 
Professor of Management and Director of the 
Graduate Program in Health Care Administration; 
Bruce W. Warren, Professor of Management and 
Chairman of the Department of Management; 
Marlyn Mackey, Assistant Professor of 
Management; Lynda L. Moore, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Management; Evangelos Kechris, Assistant 
Professor of Management; (seated) David P. 
Echevarria, Instructor in Management; Patricia L. 
Rogers, Secretary for the Department of 
Management; Katherine M. Bevacqua, Associate 
Professor of Consumer Resource Management and 
Director of Internships; Jeanne M. Liedtka, 
Instructor in Management; Leo John Parente, Pro- 
fessor of Accounting and Finance 




111 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 







Carol Frazier, Professor of Nursing and 
Chairman of the Department of Nursing; Ju- 
dith A. Beale, Adjunct Associate Professor for 
Research; Patricia Edwards, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Nursing; Maria N. Bueche, Associate 
Professor of Nursing; Eileen Mc Neely, Assis- 
tant Professor of Nursing; Lois Estelle 
Schoppee, Associate Professor of Nursing; 
Jane Cloutterbuck, Associate Professor of 
Nursing; Ann Kittler,; Jeanne Berk, Learning 
Resource Coordinator; Jane Gardner,; Phyllis 
Parnes Moore, Professor of Nursing. 



DEPARTMENT OF NUTRITION 



(left to right) Agnes M. Huber, Ph.D., Profes- 
sor of Nutrition; Bridget Agnes Bowes, lab as- 
sistant; Nancie Harvey Herbold, Ed.D., Asso- 
ciate Professor of Nutrition and Chairman; 
Coral Kenney O'Brien, B.S., secretary, Rajan 
Marion, Associate Professor; Marion Mason, 
Ph.D., Professor of Nutrition 




112 



PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT 



(left to right) Carol Ochs, Professor of 
Philosophy; Robert Gooding-Williams, Assis- 
tant Professor of Philosophy and Coordinator 
of Afro-American Studies; Ynhui Park, Pro- 
fessor of Philosophy; Diane Raymond, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Philosophy 




DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 




(standing left to right) Jude Muskett, 
Recruiting Coordinator; Polly Staley, Special 
Instructor in Physical Education; Anita Lor- 
raine, Special Instructor in Physical Educa- 
tion; Doris Olmstead, Special Instructor in 
Physical Education; (seated) Sheila Brown, 
Director of Athletics. 



113 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY 



Shelley Goodgold-Edwards, Assistant Profes- 
sor in Physical Therapy; Diane Jette, Assis- 
tant Professor in Physical Therapy; Mary 
Owens, Assistant Professor of Physical 
Therapy and Academic Coordinator of Clini- 
cal Education; Linda Smith, Secretary for the 
Department of Physical Therapy; (front row) 
Janice Toms, Associate Professor in Physical 
Therapy and Chairmen of the Department of 
Physical Therapy; Lynn Palmer, Associate 
Professor in Physical Therapy; Lynne Wiesel, 
Assistant Professor in Physical Therapy; 
Lynn Foord, Instructor in Physical Therapy 




DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 




Rick Behrman, Assistant Professor in Physics; 
Edward Prenowitz, Professor of Physics; 
Velda Goldberg, Assistant Professor of Phy- 
sics; Constantine Dokos, Assistanet Professor 
of Physics. 



114 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 




(standing) Lillian M. Grayson, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Psychology; Peter Watson Castle, 
Associate Professor in Psychology; Donald 
William Thomas, Professor of Psychology 
and Chairman of the Department of Psycho- 
logy; (seated) Teresa Sosa Carterette, Profes- 
sor of Psychology; Barbara Gentile, Associate 
Professor of Psychology; Diane T. 
Coulopoulos, Professor of Psychology. 



THE PRINCE PROGRAM IN RETAIL 

MANAGEMENT 



Gail Christine, Secretary; Milton L. Shuch, 
Professor of Retailing and Director of the 
Prince Program in Retail Management; 
(missing) Judith O'Brien, Assistant Professor 
of Retailing 




115 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 




(standing) Ronnie Elwell, Assistant Professor of 
Sociology and Lecturer in Health Care Adminis- 
tration; Judith A. Rollins, Assistant Professor of 
Sociology; Stephen London, Professor of Sociology 
and Chairman of the Department of Sociology 
(seated) Elaine Catherine Hagopian, Professor of I 
Sociology 



WOMEN'S STUDIES ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Lillian Grayson, Associate Professor of Psycholo- 
gy; Donna Hollenberg, Special Instructor in Eng- 
lish; Kathleen Dunn, Professor of Education; Pa- 
mela Bromberg, Associate Professor of English; 
Mary Jane Treacy, Associate Professor of Spanish; 
Debra Bloom, Secretary. 



116 




ADMISSIONS OFFICE 



Penny Paradee, Assistant Director; Emily 
Micolonghi, Computer and Word Processing Sec- 
retary; Lynette Robinson-Weening, Director; Mar- 
garet Rose; (seated) Anabel Alfonso, Jane Fidler, 
Records Assistants; Jenifer Coulter, Staff Assis- 
tant; Alicia Montecalvo and Lynne Telson-Barsky 
Missing: Ann McDermott, Associate Director; 
Marcia Holford, Assistant Director; Mary Casey, 
Admissions Counselor and Ruth Levitsky, Word 
Processor 




ALUMNAE AFFAIRS 




Top, Margo Steiner, B.A., Associate Director, Su- 
san E. Peecher, B.S., Assistant to the Director for 
Clubs; Bottom, Lisa Guarneri, B.A., Assistant to 
the Director for Classes; Mary Jane Doherty, B.S., 
Director; Denise Theriault, Secretary and Staff 
Assistant 



117 



BUSINESS MANAGER'S OFFICE 



Katie Tyler, Administrative Assistant; Kath- 
leen Peroni, Associate Business Manager; El- 
len Robidoux; Secretary (Missing) Walter E. 
Steere, Business Manager 




CAREER PLANNING AND 

COUNSELING CENTER 




(seated) Dr. Jonathan Ehrenworth, Director; 
Dr. Lourdes Rodriguez-Nogues, Counselor; 
Dr. Louise W. Christian, Associate Director 



118 



CAREER PLACEMENT AND STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 




(standing) Sarah Butler, Assistant Director; 
Joann Carroll, Director; Janet Harrington, As- 
sistant Director; (seated) Madeline Fine 
Recruiting Coordinator; Linda Van Vlack; 
Linda Higgins, Student Employment Secre- 
tary. 



CONTINUING EDUCATION 



Hope Pobst: secretary, Isabelle Pound: Coun- 
selor Carol Pooler: Director 




119 



HEALTH CENTER STAFF 




Standing; Mary Embry, Joan Sullivan, Diane 
Morrissey. Sitting; Debbie Buffington, Sue 
Ulin, Linda Baird 






LIBRARY STAFF 







120 



John Conti, Director of Security; Sgt. Oliver 
Elias and Lt. Dennis Spackman 



Carol Stewart 
Lower Left 



Merton Chute 
Lower Right 



SECURITY 




OPERATIONS 



MAINTENANCE 





121 



PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICE 



Elizabeth De Weese, Associate Director; Mary 
Tiernan, Public Information Assistant; Mar- 
garet Loeb, Director and Editor of Simmons 
Review 




REGISTRAR'S OFFICE 




(standing) Aluoch Ooro, Records 
Coordinator; Jean Harper, Assistant Registrar; 
Donna Haak, Associate Registrar; Sherwood 
Barrow, Registrar; (seated) Judy Karnes, Sec- 
retary 






122 



OFFICE OF RESIDENCE 




(standing) Debbie Curran, Assistant Director 
of Residence and Head Resident Evans Hall; 
Margaret Scholl, Secretary; Robert Rodecker, 
Associate Director of Residence; (sitting) 
Mary Malloy, Director of Residence 






■■w 






"&**$* **" *'^^j^^Kt' 




123 



STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 




Joyce Cheatham, Secretary; Susan 
Schleicher, Administrative Assis- 
tant; Yvette Lavigne, Beth Mattson, 
BA. Fiscal Recorder; Lisa Mayer M. 
Ed. Director; Linda Moffat, BA. As- 
sistant Director; Beth Wright. 



SUPPORTIVE INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES 



Tom Hurley, Associate Director; 
Melanie Schneider, Josephine 
Shaddock, Dr. Helen Moore, Direc- 
tor 




124 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES OFFICE 



Terri Delahunty, Director; Marita 
Rosen, Program Coordinator; Stu- 
dent Assistants; Pam Mader, Kathy 
Rajcula, Sue Vogler, Kelly Carr, 
Jeanne Doherty, Missing: Elaine 
Sparages, Camille Walker, Traci 
Turner, Karen Crosby, Chrissa 
Theodore 





125 




LIFE 







128 







129 



.Ai 



v^ 



,-J v 



s"> 







A 



& 






»* 



/ ^ C° v ^e* tf" 



/ 



^ V// .X.A 






^ 






,0 



i0> 



s^ k 



,0» v 



JO* 



,^>' 






tf 



4> 



& 



<& 



VJ* 



•V 



# 



«' 



^ 



/V 



^ 



# 



^V 



PFi? /?/#« on attending the Mother Daughter Weekend, 
December 5, 6, and 7, 1986 

Name of Daughter 

Name of Mother 




The activities that we will be attending are as follows: 
(Please check all that apply) 

Friday, December 5 

Champagne Reception 4:00 - 6:00 pm 

Saturday, December 6 

Luncheon at The Copley Plaza 

11:00 am -2:00 pm 

(Please order for yourself and your daughter, $21 per person) 

Breast of Chicken Veronique 

Filet of Sole Amandine 

Vegetarian option available upon request 

Ballet: " The Nutcracker ", 7:30 pm, $25 per person 



Sunday, December 7 

President's Brunch 10:00 am - 1 1:30 am 

Please RSVP by November 1, 1986. 
Checks can be made payable to: 

Simmons College 

Please return check and this card 

in the enclosed envelope. 



130 




r 
















131 






132 






\&* 





133 





SENIOR FACULTY COCKTAIL HOUR 
LONGWOOD TOWERS, FEBRUARY 2, 1987 



134 








- 


• 




I - - 






^Hyy^--^ ^^^ 




7 






% ' 


Ik H 




^ 








i 






<\i9yC 


1 






» ~_ 


i^Vvs^ : « 


1 






' 









135 



OTHER SENIOR EVENTS TO REMEMBER 

Father Daughter Weekend 

It was held February 27 — March 1, 1987 at the Westin Hotel. The weekend is for fathers /guardians of sophomores 
and seniors. The weekend enables fathers /guardians to get together with faculty members, to attend informal lec- 
tures, and to escort their daughters to an elegant Saturday night dinner dance. 

Valentine's Day Ball 

A lavish dinner dance, complete with good music, food, and a great time for all who attend. This year the ball was 
held at the Boston Park Plaza Hotel on February 7, 1987. 

Spring Spree 

This is the last all-College activity of the year. Held in April, it signals the coming of warm weather and a chance 
to have a good time. 

May Breakfast 

A tradition at Simmons since 1912, takes place on the first day of May. Festivities begin at 6 a.m. with the Maypole 
Ceremony, which is followed by the annual strawberry shortcake breakfast. Commuters are urged to stay overnight 
the night before May Breakfast so they could join in the fun. 

Senior Faculty Banquet 

Toward the end of the year, outstanding seniors are acknowledge at the banquet. This is a time for seniors to have 
one last good time with the faculty. This year the banquet was on April 22, 1987. 

Senior Week 

The week before commencement. Finally the week we have been waiting for for 4 years. This is one last time to 
see friends and remember the days of your college years! 

GRADUATION! WHO WOULD FORGET! MAY 17, 1987. 



136 







137 



ADMINISTRA- 
TIVE 
MANAGE- 
MENT 
SOCIETY 

The Administrative Management 
Society, or AMS, is an organization 
on campus whose purpose is to keep 
students informed on the current 
trends in management. According 
to President Mary McGray, "The or- 
ganization keeps the students aware 
of where the job possiblities are 
when they join the work force." 
AMS is an international organiza- 
tion that has chapters around the 
world. The Simmons chapter is 
officially under the Boston chapter 
and is the strongest campus chapter 
in the Boston area. 

By Samantha Meltzer 




ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING BOARD 



The Activities Programming 
Board, APB, is a very important or- 
ganization on campus. APB has sev- 
en areas of programming that are 
co-chaired by its members, making 
the organization fairly small with 
only seventeen members. These 
areas include: Annual Events such 
as Fall Fest, Spring Spree, and Win- 
ter Weekend, travel, film series, 
performing art series, cabaret and 
coffee houses, lectures, and commu- 
nity and educational programs. 
These areas together provide a well- 
rounded mixture of social, educa- 
tional and cultural programming. 

BY Samantha Meltzer 




138 




BLACK HISPANIC 
ORGANIZATION 



The BHO's aspirations for unity 
and support of black /hispanic stu- 
dents within the Simmons commu- 
nity came through in the success of 
their black harvest and Kwanza 
celebrations as well as other festive 
events organized by this unique 
group. 



Alyssa Burger 



CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 




139 



CHORALE 



The Simmons Chorale is a 40-50 
member singing ensemble that 
frequently performs on campus, 
around Boston, and in different East 
Coast special events. In addition, 
the chorale has made a number of 
European concert tours and has per- 
formed at the St. Moritz festival. 
The Chorale has become one of the 
most visible and active groups on 
campus through the hardwork and 
dedication of its members and direc- 
tor. This tradition is passed on each 
year and is the key to it's success 
each season. 



COMMUNICA- 
TIONS 
LIAISON 



The Communications Liaison has 
come together again after a long 
time. They are trying to establish 
themselves as an organization. They 
are helping the department with 
course evaluations and the 
curriculum. They also raffled Celtic 
tickets to raise money for the orga- 
nization. They are glad the organi- 
zation has been started up again 
and hopes that it will grow stron- 
ger. 




uo 



COMMUTER 
ORGANIZA- 
TION 



A large portion of the Simmons 
Community consists of commuters. 
The commuter organization strives 
to integrate its members in the com- 
munity. Social activities and 
fundraising are a small part of this 
goal. The commuter organization is 
becoming a strong voice in the 
Simmons Community. 



"'^fcjatf 



SIMMONS 
DRAMA CLUB 



This club is new. They performed 
a daring avant-guarde play first se- 
mester at Simmons called "I Read 
About My Death in Vogue Maga- 
zine". The play got rave reviews. In 
addition to their goal of performing 
a meaningful spectacular play each 
semester at Simmons, they are also 
hosting many talented people. 





141 



THE FEMINIST UNION 




Hillel is an established organiza- 
tion on campus that provides the 
Simmons Jewish community with 
religious, cultural and social pro- 
gramming. This year Hillel particu- 
larly wanted to offer programs that 
would appeal to all members of the 
Jewish community. Some of the 
highlights of the year included an 
Inter-Hillel party held at Simmons 
that included students from all over 
the greater Boston area. The party 
had a D.J., munchies, and provided 
a place for students to meet new 
friends. A special Shabbat dinner 
was held along with the weekly Ko- 
sher Kitchen meals. 

Other programs included bagel 
sales, a vendor that did makeovers, 
and a Holocaust lecture. Hillel is a 
close-knit organization that unites 
Jewish Simmons students for prayer 
and for fun! 

By: Samantha Meltzer 



HILLEL 




U2 




KOREAN CLUB 



This organization provides oppor- 
tunities for students in Simmons 
College to better understand the 
Korean people and it's culture. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY CLASS OF 1987 




143 








144 




I III ■■'■■* Mill III I 





145 



Besides late night pizza or toasted 
bagels and cream cheese, Quadside 
was a hit in hosting the popular 
country music artists "The Arm- 
strong Brothers" and the reggae 
band "Jah Spirit" for Thursday 
night entertainment. It's the place 
for midnight munchies and social 
gatherings. We'd all be lost (or a lit- 
tle more hungry) without our cafe. 

Co-Presidents; Nancy Curtis 
Melanie Kamamis 



QUADSIDE COMMITTEE 




On the Sidelines of Simmons Col- 
lege for twelve years has been a 
huddle of people devoted to a mag- 
azine that highlights the best poetry 
and prose writing of the students 
here. This year when the semi-an- 
nual magazine came out it had the 
added attraction of photography 
and artwork to go along with the 
outstanding writing of many stu- 
dents. The organization urges ev- 
eryone to begin looking through 
their creative files — even if their 
ideas have yet to be put down on 
paper — before the deadlines in 
October and February, for things to 
submit to the magazine. Sidelines is 
proud to distribute the results of 
creative endeavors to the members 
of Simmons College free of charge. 



SIDELINES 




146 



Risa Farber, Editor-in-Chief and Circulation Editor 

Audrey Hall, Layout Editor 

Lydia Kuenkler, Layout Editor 

Janie MacAllister, Layout Editor 

Lisa Erbetta, Advertising Editor 

Sue Starkie, Copy Editor 

Rebecca Dosick, Copy Editor 

Robin Redgate, Photography Editor 

Heather Cody, Business Manager 

Photography Assistants 
Carla Meyers 
Alyssa Burger 
Anne Kirby 
Marcia Lang 
Sheri Singer 
Lori Willens 

Copy Assistants 
Samantha Meltzer 
Diane McFarland 
Niki Amin 
Alyssa Burger 

Advertising Assistants 
Karen Maffucci 
Rita Pattavina 

Layout Assistants 
Wendy Weaver 
Jackie Screeton 



1 ' #sll 



MICROCOSM STAFF 

1987 



-• — 





147 



THE 
SIMMONS 

NEWS 

The Simmons News is the student- 
produced weekly newspaper that is 
one of the main sources of campus 
news, social events, academic 
affairs, as well as national and local 
news. This year the newspaper con- 
centrated on a more humanistic ap- 
proach and strove to have all 
readers present their ideas, 
complaints, or opinions on subjects 
that they felt strongly about. 

The Simmons News is the result of a 
great deal of hard work and dedica- 
tion on the part of its staff and it is 
a first-rate newspaper that Simmons 
can be proud of. 

By Samantha Meltzer 

STUDENT 

ALUMNAE 

ASSOCIATION 



The Student Alumnae Association 
is an important organization on 
campus that forms a connection 
between the alumnae and the stu- 
dents. Another goal of the organiza- 
tion is to help build school spirit. 
SAA is responsible for the planning 
of the Head of the Charles Weekend 
and promoted their annual pep rally 
and Head of the Charles Tailgate 
Party, which was a huge success. 
Another important part of the orga- 
nization is the mentor program. 
This consists of matching students 
and alumnae who are in the same 
field. This provides the student 
with a chance to get firsthand 
knowledge from someone already 
in the working world. 




By Samantha Meltzer 



148 



MODEL 

UNITED 

NATIONS 



This year much time was devoted 
in preparation for the group to re- 
present Saudi Arabia at the United 
Nations Headquarters in New York. 
Their hard work payed off in the 
excitement and intensity of this five 
day long debate among hundreds of 
colleges and universities. The team 
debated several issues some of 
which include disarmament and the 
Arab-Israeli conflict. Simmons stu- 
dents were proud to be represented 
by such a fine group of individuals 



By Alyssa Burger 




Blurbs 



Risa: Never forget all the good times — Fuzzy Navels, yogurt pie, the 
Cask, Limo ride, men troubles, procrastination, anxiety attacks, "that 
wonderful 1st floor", Cabbage Patch kidnapping, May Day, New York, 
the Cask, magazines, Playgirl, Man of the Month, and lots of laughter. 
HC 

Alyssa: Could you have gotten through sophomore year without me to 
bother you? Love ya always, HC 

Huck, even our Dads grew up together! 

3rd floor Morse Freshman year. When are we doing to dinner? 
Love, KR 

Lynne and Sharon: The four years we've been together I'll cherish 
forever NC 

Thanks Mother, Daddy and Sparky for all your moral support. I Love 
you all! NC 

Flea and Chase: C3 forever — I Love you! NC 

1983 Morse 3rd floor: Thanks for the good times. NC 










149 



FRESHMAN 
CLASS 



This year's freshman class officers 
worked toward building a strong 
foundation for the class, and looked 
to the future in hopes of raising lots 
of funds for a spectacular com- 
mencement. Under the direction of 
president Chris Morrell, the officers 
started off the year by selling au- 
thentic Simmons boxer shorts. They 
also planned a successful program 
for Parents' Weekend called Adopt- 
A-Parent. This enabled students 
whose parents were not coming for 
the weekend, to still participate. 
Different students volunteered to 
share their parents for the weekend, 
and everyone was able to participate 
and have an enjoyable weekend. 
The freshmen class officers show 
definite commitment and desire to 
develop into an active and 
productive class. 




President: Chris Morrell 
Vice-President: Amy Fontanella 
Secretary: Katie Byrne 
Treasurer: Liz Sampson 



SOPHOMORE 
CLASS 



The sophomore class of 1989 
strived this year to create a sense of 
unity among the class as well as 
throughout the campus as a whole. 
"Getting people together" was ac- 
complished at the sophomore class- 
sponsored Nine Landsdown party 
that was held at the end of the first 
semester. Another year-long goal 
was to get Simmons sweaters that 
all students would be able to pur- 
chase. The Sophomore class wants 
to raise funds through the sale of 
the sweaters so that more program- 
ming can be offered. The officers 
were: 




President: Kimberly Prescott 
Vice-President: Janice Pressman 
Secretary: Suzanne Latino 
Treasurer: Lena Rozman 




150 




President: Jennifer Bennet 
Vice President: Katie Lanza 
Treasurer: Michelle DePalma 
Secretary: Emily Deutch 



JUNIOR 

CLASS 



This year's junior class officers 
want to build spirit, and to encour- 
age everyone's involvement with 
class activities as well. Optimistic 
about the year ahead, Jen, Katie, 
Emily and Michelle have many 
unique and exciting events planned. 
In November there is the Fall Ball at 
the Harvard Club. A night of din- 
ner, music and dancing, this semi- 
formal event is a great kickoff for 
the fall semester. Several speakers 
are also going to be brought in 
throughout the year. Finally, the ju- 
nior class will end the spring semes- 
ter with a Class of 1988 picnic along 
the Charles River. 




SENIOR 
CLASS 



Stephanie enjoyed a busy aca- 
demic semester as well as handling 
the tasks of presidency. Her sincere 
efforts and optimism along with her 
officers when planning the com- 
mencement ball, the senior faculty 
banquet, senior week, and '87 days 
to graduation party, helped to make 
senior year a special one for Steph- 
anie as well as the class of '87. 

Alyssa Burger 



President: Stephanie Moran 
Vice President: Pam Mader 
Secretary: Whitney Miskell 
Treasurer: Kristen Peterson 



151 



ART AND MUSIC LIAISON 



The Art and Music Liaison sup- 
ports the arts of the Simmons Com- 
munity. It assists the department 
with evaluations, exhibits, and at- 
tempts to expand the definition of 
the arts in the Simmons Communi- 




BIOLOGY LIAISON 



The Biology Liaison is for science 
majors or for anyone who just wants 
to have fun. We sponsor many 
events to coordinate with interest in 
the biology field. Such events 
include whale watches, hiking trips, 
lectures, museum trips and our an- 
nual Career Night to give potential 
Biology majors ideas about their fu- 
ture prospects. 




CHEMISTRY LIAISON 




Where might a degree in chemis- 
try lead you? To lab work, you say? 
You may not have realized that you 
can also think about a career in art 
restoration, marketing, computers, 
or in the food sciences. Maybe even 
medicine. You may even go to law 
school to become a patent chemist. 
The possiblities are greater than you 
may think. This year's Chemistry 
Liaison was dedicated to showing 
Simmons students the many poten- 
tial paths a career in chemistry can 
take, and toward this end they orga- 
nized a career day in the fall, and 
planned a tour of an industrial lab 
in the spring. Stacey Pazar, in her 
second year as president, says the 
club's seven members traditionally 
attend award ceremonies and semi- 
nars, sponsor vendors and bake 
sales, and try to light a spark 
beneath undergraduate chemistry 
majors so they will keep the liaison 
lit in the years to come. 



By Rebecca Dosick 



COMPUTER LIASON 




The Computer Liaison provides 
students with information on career 
opportunities in computers as well 
as providing information on current 
trends in computers themselves. 

This year was the first year the 
computer department was acknowl- 
edged as a separate major in itself. It 
was also the first year that the Com- 
puter Liaison was a separate organi- 
zation and not a part of the Math 
Liaison. 

The Liaison had bake sales, sold 
pins with a computer insignia on 
them and sponsored a career night. 
Because the importance of comput- 
ers keeps growing in our society, 
the Computer Liaison helps to 
bridge the gap between those who 
have no knowledg of computers 
and our technical society. 



By Samantha Meltzer 



153 



Fostering continual and effective 
communication between students 
and faculty is the primary objective 
of the Economics Liaison. This is 
done successfully each year through 
a variety of events and functions. 

At the close of each semester, the 
Liaison spends a lot of time reading 
teacher evaluations. They make 
comments about them, and tell 
professors what the class thought 
overall. Alumni dinners, in which 
graduates come back to Simmons 
and talk about different career op- 
portunities in economics, are also 
popular among liaison members. A 
big event within the department is 
the annual t-shirt sale, and a 
holiday party is also an annual de- 
partmental tradition. 



By Diane McFarland 



ECONOMICS LIAISON 




EDUCATION LIAISON 




154 



ENGLISH 
LIAISON 

The group of about ten students 
bridged the gap between students 
and teachers, and between their 
concentration and cultural events, 
in several ways. Open houses were 
held in November and April in the 
Trustman Art Gallery. These pro- 
vided a leisurely but inviting 
atmosphere in which students and 
professors could talk about courses, 
listen to music and enjoy a snack to- 
gether. A theme dinner was also 
planned for later in the year, as well 
as a potential group excursion to the 
theater, and a reading by a local 
poet. Other annual events of the or- 
ganization include keeping up to 
date on faculty evaluations, and 
those famous bake sales, usually 
scheduled twice each semester. 




INTERNA- 
TIONAL 
RELATIONS 
LIAISON 

The world of International Rela- 
tions at Simmons encompasses the 
areas of economics, foreign lan- 
guages, government, history and so- 
ciology. Two serious talks during 
fall semester, on the Middle East 
and Latin America, and two in the 
spring on American-Soviet relations 
and apartheid, were interspersed 
this year with an annual Christmas 
party, a dinner at Professor Jack 
Hunter's house, and a senior dinner 
with the faculty. The issues within 
the I.R. department are current and 
electric ones that affect each and ev- 
ery Simmons student, regardless of 
her major. 

by Rebecca Dosick 




155 



MATH 
LIAISON 

The Math Liaison is open to all 
students, not just math majors. Evi- 
dence of this can be seen every Fri- 
day afternoon in the Special Dining 
Room. Conversation centers on 
much more than mathematics and 
students get a chance to actively 
converse with professors. 

The Math Liaison also provides 
programs that deal with different 
aspects of mathematics. A speaker 
came first semester and spoke on 
"The History of Calculus." Other 
highlights of the year included an 
Alumnae Night, a Christmas party 
and an end-of-the-year party. The 
1986-87 officers were: 

By Samantha Meltzer 



NURSING 
LIAISON 

The Nursing Liaison's goal is to 
keep lines of communication open 
between faculty and students of the 
Nursing department. The organiza- 
tion does this through a variety of 
programs, like their faculty and stu- 
dent social hour, and by stressing 
the importance of student input into 
the Nursing curriculum. 

Anyone from the Nursing depart- 
ment is welcome to join the liaison 
and to participate in the many activ- 
ities that take place throughout the 
year. Different activities that hap- 
pened this past year included prep- 
aration and planning for the senior 
pinning ceremony, the organization 
of a Big Sister /Little Sister program 
within the department, and the an- 
nual sweatshirt sale. 

By Diane McFarland 




156 



NUTRITION 
LIAISON 

The Nutrition Liaison is comprised 
:of members majoring in the nutri- 
tion department. The goal of the 
liaison is to assist students in 
furthering their knowledge of avail- 
able career opportunities, and to 
facilitate various nutrition seminars 
and activities which are offered to 
the students by the department. The 
liaison holds such activities as Nu- 
trition Career Night, Milk Run, and 
a Nutrition Awareness Week. With 
the field of nutrition constantly 
changing and new discoveries being 
made almost weekly, this is truly a 
dynamic organization. 




PHILOSOPHY 
LIAISON 

The Philosophy Liaison gives all 
students an opportunity to partici- 
pate in informal discussions and 
talks on issues that are important 
and relevant to their lives. 

One of the central parts of the 
Philosophy Liaison is the "Chats/' 
They take place about once a month, 
and cover all sorts of different 
topics. Faculty, staff, students, and 
guests from the community are all 
invited and welcomed to the 
Chats." 

This year, the liaison worked on 
putting together new activities and 
events. Such plans included attend- 
ing philosophy meetings at nearby 
colleges, and planning a combined 
"Chat" with another school as well. 
By Samantha Meltzer 




157 



The Sociology Liaison acts as a 
connecting link between faculty 
and students in the Sociology de- 
partment. Some of its tasks include 
reviewing student evaluations of 
professors each semester, hosting a 
Sociology career night for interested 
students, and holding an open 
meeting each semester, whereby 
students can talk with staff mem- 
bers and learn more about the 
whole Sociology program. 



The Student Government Associa- 
tion represents the whole student 
body, and serves as a link between 
students and faculty. The group 
works for change, and tries to show 
people that everyone on the 
Simmons campus is an important 
part of the Simmons community. 

SGA set many new and realistic 
goals during the 1986-1987 academic 
year. They worked towards chang- 
ing the pass/fail grading option 
policy to include a two-week deci- 
sion period at the beginning of each 
semester, and also thought about a 
possible meal plan for Bartol Hall. 
SGA also wants to see shuttle bus 
service for cummuter students liv- 
ing within a three-mile radius of 
Simmons, and hopes to change the 
parking policy so that resident stu- 
dents can get permits for guests 
who stay for the weekend. 



SOCIOLOGY LIAISON 




STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
ASSOCIATION 





158 




i OH YEAH ... I remember 1986-1987. The year of the new showerheads that deafened us, new VCR's in the 

, dorms, new Student Activities Director, and the new Evans Wing at the good ole MFA . . . The MCB was without a 

1 flag for a while, until a successful campaign by The Simmons News brought it back. Then we began waiting for 

ground breaking — any minute now — for that new sports complex. The three great imperatives around campus for 

i sure, were "Ask Dr. Ruth," and "Thursday night is Cosby night" . . . (and don't forget microwave popcorn!) . . . There 

i was an RA shortage and a glut of answering machines (in case he called while you were out) ... As in our previous 

I three years at Simmons, we had our moms, dads, and siblings visit Simmons on their respective weekends, and we 

remember running across Brookline Avenue every day (after four years of that, we can do anything!) . . . 

We made "Star treks" for munchies, we made copies upon copies of our resumes, and we made friends with word 

5 processors. Huey Lewis told us "It's Hip to be Square," and a lacey, soft look seemed to be coming back into fashion. 

Weight Watchers cooked up a stir on campus, but a classic idea on a Friday night still sounded like: "Let's go out to 

Friday's /Pizzeria Uno/ Dominoes /Steve's!" . . . We lost an empire (Deli, that is) but gained The Breakfast Club on 

Boylston. We could follow the light of the Citgo sign and spend an evening in the Square at the Nickledeon, Key 

West, Copperfield's, or the Cask. If we went to a Red Sox game on the "T" 75c got us there and 60c got us back. 

It was Hollywood's 100th birthday, and their presents to us included Top Gun, A Room With a View, Crocodile Dundee, 

Aliens, and the powerful Platoon . . . 

Billy Joel sang to all of us in his song "Modern Woman, " but Genesis was probably the hottest ticket in town. 
Springsteen came out with a live album that served to rekindle his fame. 

Other talk centered on Apartheid, Iranscam, the Iceland Summit, and AIDS. Voyager went around the globe. Joe 
Kennedy had a victory in the political arena, and the seatbelt law was undone. Stars and Stripes recaptured the Ameri- 
ca's Cup from Australia, New York carried the Superbowl and Boston played in the World Series (winning isn't 
everything — maybe next year, guys). Something called "The Far Side" was hot in the realm of humor, and so was the 
controversy between Johnny Carson and Joan Rivers when Rivers decided to host her own show. 

Hopefully, as all of us make our own news in May with our new Simmons degrees, we will all remember 1986- 
1987 as a fun and dynamic year. 

By Rebecca Dosick 



159 



THE CREW TEAM 

Crew is a popular sport at Simmons which requires a 
lot of dedication and teamwork from its participants. The 
team itself is divided into two levels, the Varsity team 
and the Novice team, which are made up of experienced 
and first time rowers respectively. Although Novice 
members have usually never rowed before, they provide 
a foundation for future teams, and have a strong desire 
to learn as well. After a year learning and getting 
acquainted with the sport, most Novice members move 
up to the Varsity level, rowing in either an eight- or a 
four-person boat. 

Each morning, the Varsity team practices at 6 a.m. on 
the Charles River, starting from the B.U. boathouse. 
These practices run from September-November in the 
fall, and also include afternoon sessions of weight train- 
ing. After November, the team moves indoors, and dur- 
ing the winter months, concentrates on conditioning and 
weight training workouts. 

In the fall, the team participates in few regattas, but 
looks forward to the Head of the Charles, the most well 
known, and biggest regatta in the world. During the 
spring the team stays in Boston over the March break, 
and gets ready for a busy spring season. There are races 
almost every weekend, the highlight of all races being 
the Dad Vail races in Philadelphia in mid-May. 

This year is sure to be an exciting year for the crew 
team. They have two new boats, a pair and an eight, and 
are also looking forward to developing a strong team 
with their two new coaches, Kevin Courtney and Jude 
Muskett. 




By Diane McFarland 



•»' a l§i» 



.JSb*« 



"«»<•»" '^H*' 7,0%. 




160 





.■■■:'. ■■■■ ' ' ■ ■ ,?■■'■&■:■:'. ""■'■ ,-.':.. :, : >i,~r, :'?■;£ ;-\ ■■'W ; ?'-' ' :y: i */?-* *y /**%;;■ -/ : ' : f ''>''■' '■ ,' .- '...'" ■.^Iliy*.:'':; "'" ."■■■■"'■■■■ ' " : - ■■■.; : :-' : '-- . v'-' :: " ' 
























.»^ 



i 





TENNIS TEAM 



The Simmons Tennis Team is very strong and competi- 
tive, consisting of upperclasswomen and underclasswomen 
as well. They have fifteen matches a season, including two 
major tournaments. The MAIAW tournaments are matches 
with Massachusetts colleges, and the New England tourna- 
ments are matches with other New England colleges. 

The players have great enthusiasm and high hopes for 
every game, especially the coaches, who try to encourage 
the players to do their best and at the same time psych 
up the team during a match and during practice. 

Because of their great efforts, this year the team moved 
up from Division 3 class c to Division 3 class b, which 
makes the competition tougher, but the team worthier of 
greater challenge. 



BASKETBALL 



The Simmons College Basketball Team is a young 
team, and started its fourth season this year, with prac- 
tices that began in mid-October. The team played a 
fifteen-game schedule, competing mostly against area 
New England schools in Division 3 of the N.C.A.A., and 
had a season lasting from November through the end of 
February. Boasting a successful 500 season for the 1985- 
1986 year, this year's team looked forward to yet another 
winning season in 1987. 

By Diane McFarland 



jcl 



ia< 



162 



SAILING TEAM 



It had been a long time, but coach Mark Nania was 
back to push the sailing team to their limit. With the 
added support of Sheila Brown, Simmons' Athletic Direc- 
tor who had contributed new equipment through the de- 
partment and also much enthusiasm, the sailing team 
had a busy and productive year. 

The team raced in regattas which are individual races 
in two divisions, A and B, involving different schools 
around the New England area: Boston University, Boston 
College, MIT, Brown University, Wheaton College and 
Yale, to name a few. The team faced their stiffest compe- 
tition from other women's colleges but they managed to 
hold their own with extra guidance from their captain, 
Laura Wheeler, to coast to victory. . 

by Susan Starkie 



CROSS COUNTRY 



Cross Country running is a highly individualized 
sport in which participants run a 3.1 mile distance. The 
Simmons Cross Country Team is small and 
inexperienced this year, yet it shows a lot of promise. 
Due to the fact that two top runners are abroad for the 
fall '86 semester, the team is left with only one exper- 
ienced runner. However, the team placed third at the 
Wheaton meet and expects more improvement under the 
coaching of Eleonora Mendonca and John Kirk. This is 
Mendonca's sixth year with the team — she herself is a 
Brazilian Olympian, and this is the first year for the team 
to have an Assistant Coach. 

The team's goals for the season are for each runner to 
do her personal best and to run a lot of mileage. They 
are also planning to run road races, such as the Milk Run 
that takes place in Boston in the spring. Overall, the 
team shows a lot of enthusiasm and looks forward to im- 
proved times. 



163 



FIELD HOCKEY 



The 1986-87 Field Hockey team had a positive attitude 
towards this year's season. Captain Sue Holian felt there 
was a definite improvement in the team, due mainly to 
the fact that the team had more returning players and 
therefore a lot more experience. 

It was Stephanie O'Hanley's second year as coach, so 
she had a better knowledge of the strengths and 
weaknesses of returning players as well as a better 
knowledge of the opposition, thereby creating a stronger 
team. The team competed in two major tournaments as 
well as the regularly scheduled matches. 

A major goal of this close-knit team was continued im- 
provement in playing as a team and a better overall 
record. This year they acheived their goal. 

Samantha Meltzer 






VOLLEYBALL 






ARNOLD HALL 




Arnold Hall has lots of spirit, 
and prides itself on its outgoing 
and fun residents. The residence 
hall is located next to Bartol Hall, 
on the Pilgrim Road side of the 
Quad, and hosts many exciting 
activities each semester. They 
sometimes hold weekend parties, 
inviting area schools, and have 
many fun activities just for resi- 
dents as well. These events 
include a semiformal 

champagne /tea and dinner at the 
end of the year, an active Big 
Sister/Little Sister program to 
develop closeness among resi- 
dents, and a freshman initiation 
night. If you enjoy an active, live- 
ly dorm, Arnold Hall is the place 
to be. 



DIX HALL 




Dix Hall is one of the dorms 
that believes in hall spirit, friend- 
liness, and close relationships 
between upperclassmen and 
lowerclassmen. 

This year the dorm introduced 
some innovations. At the start of 
the year, the dorm did Big 
Sister /Little Sister, which was for 
helping freshmen adjust to dorm 
life and also for the 
upperclassmen to get to know the 
new arrivals. The dorm also had 
dorm brunches with rented mov- 
ies. They also had Monday Night 
Football Nights and rented "Hal- 
loween" for Halloween. This year 
the dorm had a piano player en- 
tertain them during the Christ- 
mas party. 

Every year the dorm has trips 
to plays, The Roommate Game, 
and the infamous barbeque at the 
end of the academic year. 



166 






EVANS HALL 



Evans Hall is one of the 
prettiest dorms on campus as well 
as one of the oldest and the 
smallest. Housing only eighty 
people, Evans is a friendly dorm 
that has mostly senior singles and 
many freshman triples. Sopho- 
mores and juniors also live in the 
dorm. 

Evans Hall has some features 
that make it unique. For instance, 
it is the only dorm with an eleva- 
tor — (affectionately named 
"Prince Charles"), and it is also 
the only dorm with a rooftop 
sundeck. 

Yearly traditions are an impor- 
tant part of Evans life. These 
include the Senior Champagne 
Toast in May, which honors the 
seniors and wishes them well, a 
Mystery Ball, and "Angel Sisters" 
during the holiday season. This 
year's dorm council is: 



n $ Q, \ n 




MESICK HALL 



Mesick Hall started the year 
under unusual circumstances — 
the hall did not have a Head 
Resident. However, the dorm 
agrees that their new Head Resi- 
dent was worth waiting for, 
because they are very enthusiastic 
about Colleen Berry, the new 
H.R. 

Mesick is one of the larger 
dorms on campus and houses stu- 
dents from all class years. It is a 
dorm that is characterized by a 
sense of family among those on 
each floor. Meeting and socializ- 
ing in the lounges is a popular 
pastime. 

This year's dorm council has 
many exciting events planned for 
the dorm. These include a Reggae 
party with a steel band, a lip sync 
party, dorm brunches and a dorm 
barbeque. The dorm council con- 
sists of: 




167 



MORSE HALL 







Morse Hall believes in team 
spirit. It is this kind of spirit that 
has made a champion intramural 
volleyball team and made Morse 
a nice place to live. 

This dorm had many social ac- 
tivities this year that included ice 
cream and pizza parties as well as 
a Big Sister /Little Sister program. 
Christmas is a special time at 
Morse, when their living room 
becomes a winter wonderland for 
their annual semi-formal ball. 
Residents agree that this dorm is 
the place to be. 



NORTH HALL 




North Hall is one of the 
smaller and older dorms, housing 
about one hundred students. The 
dorm has a friendly atmosphere 
and is situated in partial seclu- 
sion in the Quad. 

The dorm has many annual 
events that are held. Big 
Sister/ Little Sister with a pizza 
party, ice cream socials, trick-or- 
treat during Halloween, The 
Roommate Game, fund raisers, 
vendor sales before Christmas, 
and the Christmas Party. The 
dorm also annually holds the 
Holiday Ball Formal, and the 
Ugly R.A. Contest, when each 
floor tries to make their R.A. the 
ugliest. 

New this year was a visit from 
Estee Lauder who gave residents 
tips about beauty and makeup, 
and also a visit from John 
Dellaria. The dorm also had 
composites done, which are indi- 
vidual pictures of each girl in the 
dorm made into a collage. 



168 



I Simmons Hall is not only the 
largest dorm on campus but is 
also the gateway to the rest of the 
Simmons residential community 

! i after 11 p.m. and before 7 a.m. It 
is a dorm in which a great deal of 
enthusiasm and comradery is dis- 
played with every activity that is 
planned. 

Although the dorm is large; 
students become acquainted with 
one another over a bowl of ice 
cream or a slice of pizza when 
the various socials are arranged. 
Simmons Hall also rocks to the 
bet of Motown with their annual 
Motown party that is quickly be- 
coming a tradition. 

Students who live in Simmons 
Hall consider it "the place to be" 
and this is certainly true around 
the holidays. A Christmas 
semiformal is held as well as an 
Angel Sisters gift-swapping 
program that results in many 
close friendships. 



SIMMONS HALL 




SMITH HALL 



Smith Hall, the second-largest 
dorm on campus, and located in 
the heart of the Quad, is a resi- 
dence hall characterized by its 
friendliness and spirit. Walking 
into Smith, one can't help but 
feel welcome amongst the bright- 
ly decorated walls and overall 
attractiveness that are only a part 
of the Smith community. 

Throughout the school year, 
Smith Hall hosts a variety of fun 
and exciting activities including 
the Dating Game, the traditional 
Big Sister /Little Sister program, 
and several weekend dorm 
brunches. Smith also houses 
Quadside Cafe, and exercise 
room, and several study rooms. 

Smith Hall has a lot to offer 
any student, and is proud to say 
that it is a dorm whose personal- 
ity is reflected through its friend- 
ly and enthusiastic people. 




169 



SOUTH HALL 







South Hall has been known ini 
the past as one of the quiet, more 
studious dorms on campus. This 
may be due to the fact that there 
are less than one hundred resi- 
dents, thereby creating an 
atmosphere where everyone 
knows and cares for one another. 

Although the sound of type- 
writers and cracking books are 
common in this dorm, so are the 
squeals of laughter when they 
hold the annual Mr. Simmons 
contest, in which men from sur- 
rounding colleges vie for the 
distinguished title. Contestants 
must answer questions and 
perform a "talent" and are then 
judged. 

South Hall also has an active 
Big Sister /Little Sister program as 
well as a festive holiday ball that 
is held in what is considered one 
of the most elegant sitting rooms 
on campus. 









17C 





171 




Reagan offers congratulations 

Red Sox manager John McNamara no sooner had reached his 
office after the pennant clinching last night than a phone call was 
awaiting. President Reagan, that old play-by-play man himself, 
was on the phone. 

"I didn't tell him anything, I just listened," said McNamara. 
"He told me congratulations, that he was very happy for us and 
Boston, and if everything goes right, he'd like to see us at the 
White House." 

McNamara no sooner had replaced the phone on its cradle 
than it was ringing again. This caller was George Steinbrenner, 
owner of the Yankees, who also wished the manager and his team 
well in the World Series. 

- MICHAEL MADDEN 



Sox are set' 






/ 



Red Sox 





172 



roll for Sox 




TM 



Bring on Mets 




y. f lf lUII 




\ Memories 



% 



y(X 



j/ 



<y. 



<* 



% 



% 



9<s 



173 



Cost of Living in 


1986-87 




Item 




Cost 


movie ticket 




$5.00 


case of beer 




$14.00 


Ruby's sub (large) 




$2.60 


Quadside Pizza (large) 




$3.40 


Domino's pizza delivered (small) 




$6.05 


Simmons sweatshirt 




$30.00-40.00 


Can of soda 




.60 


haircuts: 






Hairsystems 




$8.00 


John Dellaria 




$20.00-25.00 







\^>\V-i £«X*fo6& 





174 





♦ndfc Coetu^ 






load of laundry 




$1.50 


Steve's ice cream cone 




$1.10 


pack of cigarettes 




$1.35 


MBTA token fare 




.60 


U.S. postage stamp 




.22 


Red Sox World Series ticket 




$50.00 and up . . . 


One year's tuition complete with room & board 


$13,444 


price of a dozen roses 




$65.00 


Sunday edition of the Globe 




$1.00 


compact disc 




$14.00 


computer disk (floppy) 




$4.00 


Cosmopolitan magazine 




$1.95 


4-pack of wine coolers 




$3.00 and up 
Samantha Meltzer 



175 



" 



K 

















I* 



f. 



*fcn 



: 4,„ ■%*•,,, '%.. 




I ^-jj 




The city of New York gave the Statue of Liberty a big 
1986 bash — a Fourth of July festival of song, celebrities 
and fireworks honoring the great lady's first 100 years. 



President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail 
Gorbachev met in Reykjavik, Iceland, for a two day sum- 
mit in October to discuss arms control. The two leaders 
reached an impasse on testing of the U.S. Star Wars 
weaponry. 



177 




178 




After twenty years of ruling without serious challenge, 
Phillipine president Ferdinand E. Marcos was forced 
from office amid charges of corruption and scandal. The 
new president, Corazon Aquino, was faced with political 
and economic turmoil. 

Gennadiy Zakharov, a Soviet U.N. employee was arrest- 
ed on a subway platform in New York City and charged 
with spying. A week later American journalist Nicholas 
S. Daniloff was arrested on the streets of Moscow and 
accused of spying on the Soviet Union. Both men were 
released within weeks and the entire affair set the stage 
for a super power Summit meeting in Iceland. 



Caroline Kennedy, who captured America's heart as a 
little girl romping through the White House, married 
Edwin Schlossberg, a New York business man and art- 
ist in Hyannis Port, Massachusetts, on July 19, 1986. 

Britain's Prince Andrew married red-haired English 
commoner Sarah Ferguson in July at Westminister Ab- 
bey in a spectacle that mustered the pomp and glory 
of Britain's 920-year old monarchy. Andrew is the 
queen's second son and fourth in line to the throne. 




I 



179 




180 











1 



181 







ADVERTISING 



GOLDEN PATRONS 

Mr. and Mrs. Otto Anderson 

Mr. and Mrs. Hiram A. Archilla 

Bill and Jane Booras 

Mr. and Mrs. Craig Bradley 

Dr. and Mrs. Ronald K.Burke 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Cachianes 

Domenic and Diane Capozzi 

Jo DeLuca Carter 

Thomas and Lesley Chamberlain 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Clarkson 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph N. Cloutier 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Cooper 

Susan H. Brace-Cusic 

Richard E. and M. Sheila Cyr 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Di Maina 

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Farber 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon G. Farr 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald H. Goodman 

Robin and Kermit Green 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hageman 

Mr. and Mrs. Kittredge S. Hawkins 

The Hazen Family 

Mr. and Mrs. William Jenkins 



184 



GOLDEN PATRONS 

Harry and Mary Kamamis 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kohn 

Don McBride 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. Miller 

Rabbi and Mrs. Miller 

John B. Mueller 

Marjorie and Sam Oolie 

Dr. and Mrs. Eric F. Parthum 

The Pattavin Family 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Ramsey 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Salem 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter R. Scheffer 

Carole and Ted Slavin 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Stranberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Sweeney 

Felix and Elvira Taranto 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Taylor 

Dr. and Mrs. Anthony D. Tramontozzi 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter L. Tsokanis 

Mrs. Patricia Donaldson Turner 

Mr. Richard Edward Turner 

Mrs. Juanita Vivens 



k 



185 



PATRONS PATRONS 



Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Aaron 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick L. Adams 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Albertelli 

Dr. and Mrs. Anthony J. Arena 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Bain 

Mrs. Clement Bauman 

Mr. and Mrs. Dominick R. La Bella 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Biehn 

Dr. and Mrs. Gerald Blumenthal 

D.L. and Muffie Boisen 

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis A. Bolton 

Mr. and Mrs. Mariano G. Bono 

Joao M. Borges and Dulce F. Borges 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Boucher 

Mr. and Mrs. C.W. Boynton 

Martin and Alayne Burger 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael L. Carpenter 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul D. Cleveland 

Jim and Joyce Cody 

Jack and Claire Curran 

Jim and Rose Curry 

Mr. and Mrs. John D. Curtin Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Paul Deschene 

Diehl Family 

Brenda DiGiovanni 

Mr. and Mrs. John Dortch 



186 



PATRONS PATRONS 



Mrs. Judith M. Gibson 

Mr. and Mrs. Herschel C. Hall 

Jeanne and Denis Halliwell 

Barbara and Payson Hurwitz 

Jean Farren Jones 

Maxene and David Levine 

Dr. and Mrs. Albert L. Lichtmann 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan R. MacVicar 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Mader 

Frank and Eleanor O'Sullivan 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Pannell 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon F. Price 

Mr. and Mrs. W.M. Priestly 

Dr. and Mrs. Fernando Ramirez Tio 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Rajcula 

R. Roger Remington 

The Family of Shari Roemer 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Shaffer 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald H. Shaw 

Leah and Alan Schwartz 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan Siegel 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip A. Simplicio Jr. 

David and Phyllis Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond W. Starvish 

Robert A. and Dorothy Thistle I 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Ulbrich 



187 



Congratulations 

To The 

Class of '87 



From Your Homes 
Away From Home 



ARNOLD HALL 
DIX HALL 
EVANS HALL 
MESICK HALL 
MORSE HALL 
NORTH HALL 

SIMMONS HALL 
SMITH HALL 
SOUTH HALL 



188 



1983 MORSE HALL 3RD FLOOR 

Guido, Chucka, Bernice, Flipson, Thistlebaum 

Reboldi, Chase, Flea, Starfish, Smith, Mel 



Hey Spudster. . .Toga. 
How to avoid E.R.... 
Hi Jean...Cimy Limits 
What ' s up Chuck? . . . 



Tl 




The dungeon. . .Rat nest 
Walks around Boston. . . 
40,000 lbs of bananas. 
Nuclear War Month... Mr 
Chin. . .Sleepwalking. . . 
Bernhard . . .Why me? ... . 
Chucka ' s haircut . . .RA- 
RA session in the Quad 
Scorpion Bowls .. .Tears 
For Fears-wake up Guido 
it's 2: 00... It Lives.. 
At your leisure. . .Time 
to make the doughnuts. 
Steve's Pizza. . .Kelly- 



Bon Voyage Guido 
Banana bread. . .Stress 
Where's Triangle?... 
Mario lost an eye... 
Triple with Joanne.. 
Visit me ! . . . Irving . . 
"Just want to bug ya 
Sharing secrets - Oh 
well . . . Fontaine ' s . . . . 
Squid. . .Bunny. . .tears 

The Group. . .critters. {SiW j I cash on ly«'« Feed your. 

Ta Chien. . .collages . . *u* ! .£ m A - f ace .. .Nancy , one, two 

Banquet table .. .Bells "^ " W » M Freddies comin for you 

Bartol manners. . .All "Mel has nice guns!"., 

nighters in mgt dept... When's dinner? .. .Did we forget anyone? .. .Shear Madness... Oh no! I 
am PMS...Andy, they didn't think we'd last a month... Toby Minnie hanging from the ceiling 
"How can you know that you love someone when you're so young?" .. .diamonds, emeralds, opals 
and gold. . ."Where oh where are my cotton balls?" .. .chest .. .eggs in the fan. . .marble in a. 
candle stand. . .wrestling matches. . .Escaping on the weekends .. .Spider bites .. .Spazzing. .. . 
"I'm gonna flunk". . .Taking a class with men! .. .4th floor Wheelock cubicles .. .Road trip to 
Andy 's. . .Guido, we missed you junior year .. .Hefty , hefty, hefty — Wimpy, wimpy, wimpy .. .Puffer 
bellies? .. .Yah! That's the ticket .. .Let 's go to bed now! . . .Spanky pants... You almost gave 
me a nervous breakdown. . .Spring Spree'86 and sweat pants saga. . .Match making by Melanie. 
Long hair-short hair -perms .. .Surprise! ? ! birthday parties. . .Cecilia. . .Cabbies. . .E.T. .J. T 
Father /Daughter .. .quarters. . .boxers. . .jockey hipsters .. .Townie bond... "I Slept At Killing 
ton" red rags on a hanger... the big N... Simmons Sweatshirts. . .pizza. . .bridge. . .tuck-in. 
Hall Council. . .Medieval Manor... Baby Gamilla. . .Summer at SAE. . .roses and rainbows .. .The 
European. . .D. P. .. .marker fights. . .Guiding Light .. .Mystery Ball .. .competition. . .Quadside 
Why?!? (RA-RA) . . . roommate swaps. . .Annie T. Eddie T. Dot tie T... Valentine's Day Ball.. 
Moving out to a new home... "I didn't go to sleep last night" .. .showering in darkness.. 
Get this first day over with. . .Midnight-Sociology and Psychology talks... "I'm allergic to 
dust". . .Doing the lobster at the Mystery .. .dresses draped in ski jackets. . .Bowling. . .The 
pink sweatpants. . .Blind dates... Just us girls... Til Tuesday .. .When you have nothing, you 
have nothing to lose. . .SPIT. . ."Oh I'm really going to scream" .. .Sell the Buick..."It just 
doesn't matter". . .Confidence! .. .Heartless, hopeless and the bitch... "I'm taking off o.k?" 
It's a UFO! .. ."Girls, this is highly irregular!"... Rich 1-2... Brian, Brian, Peter-Revere 
Beach... SAE formals. . .daiquiri parties. . .N.Y.C. -Studio 54...Crewies crying at breakfast.. 
Aku Aku. . .popcorn. . .3rd stall. . .Michael Jackson craze... the Geek. . .meetings. .Fincher date 
Cask n' Flagon. . .party in the smoker .. .N.U. running for the shuttle .. .Who 's date is who's 
Smartfood. . .St inkbomb. . .Monster Dash... Read my lips .. .waterbed. . .Thompson Twins .. .Of f ice . 

of Residence of Management Gordon St .. .Friday 's on Friday .. .Chipper K's .. .cruise .. .Yeah 

Yeah. . .Debbie does what? .. ."Guido want to make a bet?" .. .Slinky .. .aquarium. . ."You're 

going straight to hell". . ."Well I've never-Oh yes you have" .. .Tufts and the Tufts towel.. 
Spring Break-AAA killergrams, Happy B'day Nancy... Echo and the bunnymen meet the dust-... 
bunnies. . .Coast Guard, Navy, Air Force... The penthouse suite .. .parties with Ed & Co-"Are 

you breathing?" ...Who's dancing on the table? .. ."Way-stoked! ".. .Sebastian, Muffy, 

Buffy, Snuffles. . .MIT* *Quasi-Qui. . .Benetton scrubs .. .weekend in Maine .. .Waldo' s-Where 's my 
purse! .. .Tas. . .crossing Brookline Ave... I'm wishing you were here. . .HOME. . .Flipson, will, 
we be roommates next year too? .. .Student Employment with Deb .. .Interrupted slumber party 
in room 404... Copy and Proof ing. . .Hyannis June of '85... Are you two twins?... Can I go ... 
with your brother? .. .Are you two sisters? .. .Sweet dreams .. .Good Night Chucka... 



We 



made it you guys! Remember the good times. Love always. 



189 



mKumjjmmuu 



Best Wishes 
from all of us 



BayBank Boston. 



BaVBank 



190 






CONGRATULATIONS 
CLASS OF '87 







PROUD TO BE YOUR FOOD SERVICE 



191 



Congratulations 
to the Class of 1987 




The Simmons College 

Bookstore 

and 

Barnes and Noble 



192 



Page 193 










To the Staff of MICROCOSM 


'87, Thanks 


so much for all you 


have done. 


I don't know what I would have 


done without each and every one of you. 












THANKS!!! 










Risa Farber 










Editor 







Class Of 1987 

Good Luck 
With your Future Endeavors! 

The 

Sophomore 

Class 



C^: Thanks for everything, I love you both! SC 

Cindy and Jim, Best of luck and happiness always! 

Love Sharon 

3rd floor Morse "83-84": "May God hold you in 
the palm of his hand always. Love flea 

Special Thanks to Mom and Dad and love to 

Steve! 



Congratulations 

to the 

Class of 1987 

From 



RUBY'S PLACE 



Home of the Famous 
Ruby's Sub* 

and soda, candy, cookies, chips 



193 




Mesick floors 1 and 2: Colleen, Joanne, Jill, Jean,: 
Thanks for a terrific year and being my "Simmons 
Family" — Debbie 

Dave: Thanks for making my Senior year the 
most enjoyable — with love, The Superior One 

Lisa H.: Remember frosh year? MB and JB at Beta? 
Chinese Food in Harvard Square. Thumbing 
centerfold of Nurse's Playboy magazine: HELP! The 
Elliot Halloween. Party at the Cape with Chris: At- 
tack! Pizza Pad, Suzy Q's, Dancing at Who's, OT's 
and Rascals. And of course, all the Men. We've 
come a long way. Thank you for your special 
friendship. Love ya lots — M. 

Heather C: Always remember winter break of 
'85. We survived it together. Thanks for all the 
talks, Wishing you the best in whatever you do! 
MM 

Special thanks for Mom, Dad, and Sean — mm 

Sue C: Remember when we first met? We sur- 
vived it, didn't we? You're the greatest. Thanks for 
always being there. Love ya, MM 

Thanks Mom, Dad, and Jim for all you've done! I 
love you all! Sharon 



Congratulations and Welcome 
to the Club 



Merrimack Valley 
Martha Anderson 

Susan Bain 
Jennifer Bousquet 
Stephanie Moran 



Pamela Parthum 

Danielle Schwartz 

Mary E. Taylor 

Jean Thistle 



SIMMONS CLUB 




MANAGEMENT DESIGN ASSOCIATES, INC. 

P. O. BOX 44, MARBLEHEAD, MASSACHUSETTS 01945 



• CONSTRUCTION PROJECT MANAGEMENT 

(617)631-9536,j24hr.) 
"Congratulations Lisa!" 





Congratulations 




to the Class of 1987! 




Good Luck in the Future! 




—The Class of 1988 




Bergen County 


Sarah Cooper 


Claire Martinez 


Judith Dash 


Deanne Mayrowetz 


Mary Fee 


Jennifer Merrill 


Maria Fernando 


Yvonne Moukides 


Pamela Gill 


Elizabeth O'Connor 


Susan Green 


Janis Oolie 


Caryl Ix 


Linda Oshman 


I Pamela Mader 


Susan Scheffer 



194 



To the third floor Morse: You did it! Congratulations 
to every one and thanks. AS 



To MC,CH,TM,DE,AH,JM,WW,LK: Thanks for all the 
wonderful times Love, AS 



SPUD: Thanks for hangin in and being a buddy 

To AT, LT,LS, AL: I just wanted to let you guys know 
that "I Love You" Thanks for the past four years. It's 
been great!!! 

Original Third floor Morse: Remember the good times. 
I'll miss you all. Luv, 'Chuck 

Bellion: I'm glad our dads grew up together!! Chuck 

Flipson and Jean: Why???RA! RA?!? Chuck 

Andy, Triangle and I Miss ya!! Chuck 

Mom, Dad, and Brian Thanks!! I Love You guys!! 
Chuck 

To all my PT friends: Hang in there — you're almost 
done! A Tram. 

Thanks for everything Mom and Dad You're the great- 
est! Ann 



Mom and Das Sloane: Thanks for always being there 
when I need you Love, Allysen 

Ed: Thanks for the memories! Love, Al 

Mike, Cissy, Brenda, Eric, Cheri, Jennifer and Spritz: 
How goes it? Love, Al 

B,H,C: It has been a great four years: city life, friend- 
ships made and experience gained. CC 

Beth: Thanks for the good time, You're going to be a 
great PT, so keep smiling. Your friend forever— Deb 

Ann Tram: I'll miss your messages about Art on my 
machine. Remember your promise! Love, Risa 

Stephanie Dominkas, alias HC — You sexy Mama you! 

HC: Remember Rm. 115 We had a great year together 
. . . The Cask, the Cask, the Cask. . . the cow and the 
cup . . . You dropped a bomb on me baby . . . Love, 
Risa 





S<<fo\ 




lV* (0 \^ e 



hi 



l' 



MASCO 
Copy Center 



221 Longwood Avenue 

Serving the Longwood Medical Area 



JL 



Eys^ 



w 



ex n ^ 



3c a copy and less 



Services include: 



• Xerox and Kodak copying 

while you wait 

• Offset printing 

• Free pickup and delivery 
•24-hour turnaround 

• Photocopy reductions 

• Folding and binding 



• Graphic design 

• Mailing lists 

• Word processing 
•Typesetting 

• Word processing 
converted to typesetting 

• Laser imaging 



Open Monday 
through Friday. 
7 30 a m to 6 00 p r 



195 



Our Very Best Wishes 

For Your Personal 

and Professional Success 

Class of '87 

We Look Forward to 

Publishing All Your Triumphs 

in Class Notes! 

THE SIMMONS REVIEW 



196 




I 



197 



Congratulations 
Seniors 



From 



YOUR OFFICERS 






President — Stephanie Moran 
Vice President— Pamela Mader 
Secretary — Whitney Miskell 
Treasurer — Kristin Peterson 



198 



To CM, MC, AS, DE, LK, WW: It will never end unless we let it! CHH 

MKA: I Love You! Never lose faith in yourself! EPR 

Slob: Thanks for your support and crazy intoxicated evenings-Little Miss Neat 

Lisa and MB: Yeah, that's it, that's the ticket EM 

Rob: alias Susan, Be Good EM 

Mart: The Past three years have been unique. I'm glad we got to share them EM 

Pammy and Pauli: I'll always be there to rub your backs PEM 

Chuck and Thistlebaum: Why?? (Ra-Ra) 

Ding and Deb: You're two of a kind Kongs! 

Oz and Mom: Thanks for being there. I Love You 

Reboldi sweet dreams and good night peach blossom 

Morse 3rd floor (1983): I'll miss you all LG 

To HS, AH, CB, KL, DS,: Thanks for all the fun and scary times!! I'll miss you all! Mades 

Hey you guys-Where's ChiChi with the yayyo?? Hugs and Kisses 

Rebecca: To express the dearness of your friendship to me would only be belittled by our beloved medium worlds Love always, Kath 

Louise: Tout, tous les temps a toi! Katryn 

Thanks Mom and Dad, for four great years MB Laz 

Sweens: It all began freshman year — 1st floor. Remember Sue and her bird and rubber nose. We've come a long way since then and I'm glad that 
we're still friends! Love ya, Risa 

FRM: Thanks for a "wacky" walk through a tough four years! Love Debs 

MARE: My "X" Thanks for all the support. I needed it! love' Debs 



YOUR 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

ASSOCIATION 



Wishes the Class of 

1987 

The Best of Luck 
In the Future 



199 



LAST STOP GRADUATION: MAY 17, 1987 





m 





COLOPHON: 

Inter-Collegiate Press printed 450 copies of the 1987 MICROCOSM on 80 lb. enamel. Copy was reset in Malibu 
and Malibu Italics. Color pages were produced from type C prints photographed by The Cambridge Studio and 
staff photographers. 

Special Thanks: 

To Mr. Jon Nelson, of Inter-Collegiate Press, without whose sense of humor, infinite patience and sincere dedica- 
tion this book would not have been possible!! Many many thanks! 



200 



"«<™»a«»»ilMBK!S«EeS^^